History

Courses

HIS 1010. United States History to 1877. 4 Units.

History 101 is a chronological survey of American History to 1877, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare students with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 1010A. United States History to 1840. 0 Units.

History 101A is a chronological survey of American History to 1840, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare students with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 1010B. United States History From 1840 to 1877. 2 Units.

History 102 Part 2 is a chronological survey of American History from 1877 to the present, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare student with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 1020. US History from 1877 to the Present. 3 Units.

History 101 is a chronological survey of American History to 1877, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare students with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 1020A. United States History From 1877 to the Present I. 0 Units.

History 102 Part 1 is a chronological survey of American History from 1877 to the present, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare student with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 1020B. United States History From 1877 to the Present II. 4.5 Units.

History 102 is a chronological survey of American History from 1877 to the present, focusing on American social, intellectual, political and diplomatic institutions. Major topics in the course include the nation's culture and diversity and the role of the U.S. during the period within the broader context of world history. The main goal of this course is to prepare student with the analytic and critical thinking skills necessary to be successful students in courses at the college level. Students will be challenged to think critically and to analyze diverse social perspectives, historical narratives and varied interpretations of U.S. History.

HIS 3040. Washington to Hollywood: the Impact of Popular Culture on Politics, Race and Religion in America. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines the interplay between mass media and politics, race, and religion in contemporary American society. Students investigate the influence of popular culture on such critical topics as abortion, presidential politics, race, national security, judicial appointments, corporate corruption, and questions concerning moral values. Through lectures, critical dialogue, guest speakers, films and documentaries such as Fahrenheit 911, Crash, and Passion of the Christ, students examine view points spanning the left, right, and center of the political spectrum.

HIS 3060. Standing for Justice: History of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines the major events and themes of social justice in African-American history during the contemporary period. Social, cultural, and philosophical contexts are presented as students become acquainted with such notable figures as Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, and Zola Neale Hurston through their writings and political action. A close look at the events of the '60s provide a backdrop for understanding civil rights issues and movements in the African-American community today.

HIS 3210. History of African American Music and Culture in Los Angeles. 3-4 Unit.

Los Angeles has been one of the most important and prolific centers of black music in the United States. Yet, its contribution has been under-appreciated and in some cases unknown. This class considers the evolution of secular black music and culture in Los Angeles from the turn of the century to the present. Key topics include jazz on Central Avenue, R&B, Horace Tapscott and the Pan-Afrikan Peoples Arkestra, the mid-1960s Watts sene, Hip-Hop/Rap, and the Leimert Park cultural scene. Topics are studied through readings, music, videos, and occasional guest scholars and artists.

HIS 3240. Catch the Fire: History and Culture of The Black Church. 3-4 Unit.

In this class students explore the historical and cultural underpinnings of African American theology. Tracing the sources of theology from within the black historical experience, a significant focus of study includes the continuing role and engagement of the church in the struggle for racial and social justice. Students critically examine the historical and cultural context of the emergence of the church from its historical roots in Africa, through the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and civil rights and Black Power Movements.

HIS 3310A. The Rise of the Black Power Movement and The Black Panther Party. 3-4 Unit.

HIS 3320. The Immigration Debate in Historical Perspective. 3-4 Unit.

The United States had an essentially open border at the turn of the twentieth century, so why has increased border control become one of the top concerns of many Americans at the start of the twenty-first? The current, often volatile and certainly emotional debates about immigration raise questions about not only the reform of immigration policy, but also the meanings of American citizenship and the futures of the nation. This course will analyze the contemporary immigration controversies through a close examination of their historical roots. Course topics will include the history of immigration policy in the United States; analysis of the relationships between the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of immigration, past and present; engagement with contemporary community groups that take different perspectives on immigration; analysis of the current proposals for immigration reform by the House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, and individual political representatives; and critical comparisons with immigration policies used by other countries.

HIS 3360. Environmental & Social History of Los Angeles. 3-4 Unit.

The place we now call Los Angeles emerged 17,000,000 years ago from the Pacific Ocean. In the intervening years, mountains forced their way up from the land forming the boundaries of a large basin. Vast quantities of water coursed down the north and south sides of mountains and hills we now call Santa Monica, Simi, Santa Susanna, San Gabriel, and Verdugo. For all but 8,000 of those years, this place and those mountains needed no name. They just were. Then came the Tongva, the Chumash, and others - the first humans to settle here. Their names for this place were various: Kaweenga, Pasheekwnga, Komiivet, to name a few. After what seems to have been 8,000 relatively peaceful years, representatives of the Spanish King arrived in an area somewhere near the confluence of the Los Angeles River and the Arroyo Seco, declared this place to be El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula. This course examines the changes in the land going forward from that time.

HIS 3370. Harlem Renaissance in the Jazz Age: 1920-1938. 3-4 Unit.

This course critically examines the Harlem Renaissance as a by-product of the first Great Migration of African Americans from the south to the north at the turn of the century. The Harlem Renaissance, like the Great Migration, came to symbolize a people reborn as they moved from plantation to urban settings. This course focuses on artists, social activists, intellectuals and political operatives of the Harlem Renaissance that include such luminaries as W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Duke Ellington, Marcus Garvey, Langston Hughes, Billie Holiday, and Alain Locke. This course introduces students to the history of the United States from the age of exploration to the end of the Civil War. The course explores several questions: What is American history? From whose vantage point is it typically told? What does it mean to write a people's history? Can history be radical? Although much of history consists of names, dates, places, and people we were once told to memorize by our elementary- and high-school teachers, this course focuses instead on how we make sense of that past and why history is written in the way that is. Among the major themes this course addresses is the question of America and American as identities, places, ideologies and social positions. Though we use these terms often what exactly do we mean by them? What does it mean, for example, to call oneself an American? How does that concept change according to positions of class, race, gender, or sexuality? Can someone from Bolivia call herself an American? Does it mean the same thing to North Americans? If someone tells you while you are travelling abroad that he or she appreciates American culture, is he or she referring to a Jackson Pollack painting, Yosemite National Park, Donald Trump, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, or a hamburger? In this course we will grapple with some of these issues. We will draw upon our own personal experiences to each come up with our own unique definition of American culture. For some this may be as simple as identifying with the neighborhood one grew up in. For others, however, the idea of being American or of American culture may not be bounded by space or time.

HIS 3500. Prior Learning: History. 0 Units.

HIS 3510. Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

HIS 3530. Internship. 1-5 Unit.

HIS 4030. Situating the Self in the 20th Century. 3-4 Unit.

Notions of the self, subjectivity, and identity have been central to the history of the 20th century and have driven debates about race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, politics, and social justice. This course maps out sections of this history and these debates as represented in the works of Freud, Lacan, Foucault, Irigaray, Kristeva, and others. This course provides an overview of key theoretical and philosophical concerns of the past century.

HIS X2000. History / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

HIS X2005. History & UCE / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

HIS X4000. History / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

HIS X4005. History & UCE / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

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