Courses

PHI 2500. Prior Learning: Philosophy. 0 Units.

PHI 2510. Independent Study: Philosophy. 1-5 Unit.

PHI 3100. Religious Worldviews: How Religion Constructs Our World. 3-4 Unit.

This interdisciplinary humanities course uses methods and insights from history, philosophy, and sociology to examine the religious worldviews of Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam in terms of their experiential, mythological, doctrinal, ethical, ritual, and social dimensions. In light of each of these worldviews, the issues of nationalism, capitalism, globalization, technology, environmentalism, feminism, and education are explored. The overriding concern of the course is to understand and appreciate the concrete ideological implications of three religious worldviews. Representatives of these religious traditions participate as guest speakers to provide direct experience of these worldviews and their implications.

PHI 3110. Living a Meaningful Life: Practice of Buddhism in the West. 3-4 Unit.

The twentieth century has been marked by chaotic dislocations, social upheaval and a deepening loss of faith in Western secular and scientific values. As a result of these events, some of the major themes of the 20th century have been of alienation and the absurdity of life along with a corresponding retreat into fundamentalist attitudes about both science and spirituality. It may be however, that this loss of cultural equilibrium is also offering opportunities for new and creative understanding of the purpose and meaning of one's life. One such opportunity may be found in the entry of Buddhism into Western civilization. This class combines an examination of Western roots as well as Buddhist perspectives, combined with on-going experiential work in meditation. Some of the questions include: How can we search for wisdom as opposed to technical knowledge? What does authenticity mean, and how can we develop it? How can the intellect be developed to search for meaning rather than flattening it in the search for factual reality? What does it mean to be a human being?.

PHI 3120. The Mystical Rationalism of Socrates In the Platonic Dialogues. 3-4 Unit.

PHI 3200. The Quest for Wisdom: a Brief History of Philosophy. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces the undergraduate student to the discipline of philosophy and to the development of western thought from the pre-Socratics to post-modernism. Key periods in the development of philosophy are identified and central philosophers from each period are discussed through reading selected primary sources. Perennial philosophical issues such as the nature of reality, the sources of knowledge, and the basis of ethical action are examined, and essential philosophical perspectives such as realism, idealism, pragmatism, existentialism, logical positivism, and deconstructionism are defined and placed in their historical context. The course provides the student with the essentials of the history of philosophy that are useful in understanding references made in courses and in general academic discourse.

PHI 3500. Prior Learning: Philosophy. 0 Units.

PHI 3510. Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

PHI 3900. Karl Marx: Ideas That Changed the World. 1 Unit.

This workshop will investigate the central and most influential elements of Marx's thought (e.g., Alienation, Fetishism, Exploitation, Historical Materialism, Class Consciousness, Dialectics, and Ideology). Students critically investigate and weigh Marx's thought in an effort to assess its current value for understanding the world. No grade equivalent allowed.

PHI 4030. Situating the Self in the 20th Century. 3-4 Unit.

Notions of the self, subjectivity, and identity have been central to the history of the 20th century and have driven debates about race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, politics, and social justice. This course maps out sections of this history and these debates as represented in the works of Freud, Lacan, Foucault, Irigaray, Kristeva, and others. This course provides an overview of key theoretical and philosophical concerns of the past century.

PHI 4140. Foucault: Discourse and Discipline. 3-4 Unit.

Foucault's work on history and social philosophy has shaped the development of various fields from literary theory, to criminology, to psychology and gender studies. This course grounds students in Foucauldian theories and concepts, considers various ways they've been applied, and also weighs the more substantial criticisms of his work. To have a good understanding of Foucault is to have a good grasp on many of the significant movements - in philosophy, social science, and political activism - of the current moment.

PHI 4900A. Freedom and Responsibility: the Philosophy of Existentialism. 1 Unit.

In this one day workshop students have an opportunity to map out the philosophical territory of Existentialism: becoming familiar with principal contributors to the movement - Camus, Sartre, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, De Beauvoir, and Heidegger - charting parallels in their thought, and giving special attention to differences. In addition students ponder two of the key ideas in Existentialism - the freedom and responsibility of the individual. No grade equivalents allowed.

PHI 4900AZ. Foucault Workshop. 1 Unit.

Foucault's work on history and social philosophy has shaped the development of various fields of study from literary theory to criminology to psychology and gender studies. This workshop grounds students in the most influential of Foucault's ideas, theories and concepts; provides examples of how they have been, or can be, applied in various fields; and briefly considers some of the more substantive critiques of his work. To have a solid understanding of Foucault is to gain a good grasp of many of the significant movements in philosophy, social science, and political activism over the past half-century. No grade equivalent allowed.

PHI 4900B. Figuring Foucault. 2 Units.

Foucault's work has had enormous influence in a variety of fields of study (e.g. Psychology, History, Politics, Literature and Philosophy), and always provides provocative challenges to assumed ways of knowing and being. This workshop situates the diverse thought of Foucault within its various frameworks, and then attempts to unpack some of the key concerns of his work. Among the topics attended to: knowledge/power, the will to power, the panopticon, discourse, discipline, ethics, resistance, and sexuality.

PHI X2000. Philosophy / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PHI X2001. Phil & Bus / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PHI X4000. Philosophy / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PHI X4001. Phil & Bus / Humanities Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.