Psychology

Courses

PSY 0. Do Not Use. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 1040. General Psychology. 3 Units.

This is the first semester of yearlong introductory course that will provide students with an overview of the current body of knowledge and methods of the science of psychology. In the first semester, topics will include the biological basis of behavior; sensation and perception; states of consciousness; and learning and memory; and in the second semester, developmental psychology; personality psychology; social psychology; abnormal psychology; and motivation and emotion. . Emphasis also will be placed on the historical foundations of psychology and the application of psychology to diverse human endeavors.

PSY 1050. General Psychology. 3 Units.

This introductory course will provide students with an overview of the current body of knowledge and methods of the science of psychology. Topics will include the historical foundations of psychology, cognition, emotions, learning, human development, biological bases of behavior, personality, psychological disorders, psychotherapy and behavior change, and social behavior. Emphasis also will be placed on the application of psychology to diverse human endeavors.

PSY 2500. Prior Learning: Psychology. 0 Units.

PSY 2510. Independent Study: Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 3010A. Addiction & Human Development. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides an overview of the theories of human development and a critical analysis of the disruptive impact of addiction on the natural developmental process. Areas of study will include, developmental deficits, developmental arrest in recovering clients, delayed reactions to childhood trauma, the stages of recovery, a developmental model of recovery and the dominant discourses that influence human development. This course will also investigate the prevention and intervention techniques used to minimize the impact of addiction on human development. This course is one of several core courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3070. History and Systems of Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides an overview of historical tendencies in the history of psychology and introduces participants to some of the major systems that have developed during the past century. Emphasis is placed on the social context in which psychology originated and the philosophical issues underlying central psychological controversies. The course touches on the Eastern philosophy of Zen Buddhism, the Japanese psychotherapy of Morita and Naikan, and African healing traditions. Students explore the manner in which psychology functions in the present world as a form of practice and ideology.

PSY 3080A. Existential Psychology: Roots, Theory, and Practice. 3-4 Unit.

This course will explore the major themes of Existential Psychotherapy from the perspectives of psychology, philosophy, film, the expressive arts and literature. The Existential movement will be studied within a broader framework from positivism to postmodernism. Students will be introduced to the contributions of Irvin Yalom, Viktor Frankl and James Bugental, as well as a range of clinical practices. Emphasis will be placed on the themes of authenticity, meaning, freedom, responsibility, agency and choice. The class format will include experiential exercises, discussions and films that trace existential concepts within society and everyday experience.

PSY 3090. Abnormal Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

In this course, a critical perspective on abnormal psychology is presented through consideration of methods of conceptualizing the individual, concepts of normality vs. abnormality, subjectivity vs. objectivity, and the medical model vs. the humanistic-existential model.

PSY 3110. Contemporary Modes of Counseling. 3-4 Unit.

This course offers a collaborative, interactive introduction to six major contemporary models of psychotherapy: Existential, Humanistic, Cognitive, Gestalt, Narrative, and Solution-Focused therapies. Students will explore these models through reading, discussion, class exercises, instructor role-play, and DVD presentations. The course also guides students in looking critically at the material presented through the lens of cultural sensitivity and issues of social justice.

PSY 3110A. Foundations of Art Therapy: Past, Present, and Practical. 3-4 Unit.

This 10-week experiential course invites students to explore the power of art through an historical, contemporary and practical approach to art therapy. Students will learn how art therapy influences and works in tandem with neuroscience, attachment, clinical art assessment tools, art directives and interventions. Students will explore the power and significance of art materials and how to work with various populations. Through the use of readings, lectures, discussions and art making, students will gain self-awareness through a reflective and introspective process. Students will explore clinical issues seen through commonly used contemporary theories & art therapy lenses, and gain insight into the universal nature of art, illustrating how clinical issues can be accessed, assessed and healed through the use of art and psychotherapy.

PSY 3110B. Art Therapy in Practice. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3140A. Addiction & Marginalized Populations. 3-4 Unit.

This course identifies special problems, issues, and concerns for individuals challenged by addiction within specific population groups. The course offers an overview of the historical issues involved in the intercultural socialization process. This course focuses on the social-psychological dynamics of diverse and marginalized population groups that are challenged by addiction (such as individuals that are disabled, individuals diagnosed with HIV/AIDS, women, the LGBT community, criminal offenders and adolescents). Ethnic and cultural differences will be emphasized to provide students the skills needed to communicate effectively with diverse populations. This course is one of several core courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3160A. Queer Counseling & Narrative Practice. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3170A. Counseling Addiction & Co-Occurring Disorders. 3-4 Unit.

This course will delve deeply into the intricacies of counseling clients with addiction and co-occurring disorders paying special attention to how this population is marginalized and the dominant discourses that influence the standard of care. Co-occurring disorders refers to co-occurring substance use (abuse or dependence) and mental disorders. Course contents include: cultural and contextual factors of the co-occurring population, evolution of the co-occurring disorders (COD) field, the guiding principles in treating clients with COD and strategies, key techniques and treatment planning for working with clients who have COD. This course is one of several expertise/skills courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3180B. Addiction & Family Dynamics. 3-4 Unit.

This course is designed to provide learners with clinical skills that will assist significant others (partner, family, employer, etc.) of those struggling with addiction to become advocates for the treatment and healing process. Course contents include exploring the following; the multigenerational nature of substance use disorders in family systems (with emphasis on the risk factors for addictive behaviors); the dynamics of families affected by dysfunction; the impact of child abuse and neglect and how that impacts future adult behavior, family values, norms, roles and beliefs of the family system, and common patterns of adaptation. The approach will be to analyze and examine the ideas and dynamics of family relationships and challenge the dominant discourses that influence them, and to develop strength-based strategies for the worker who counsels these people. This course is one of several expertise/skills courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3190. Ethics in Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3-4 Unit.

This course explores fundamental ethical theories and applies them to an understanding of professional ethics in counseling. A variety of Western views are addressed including deontological, utilitarian, virtue ethics, and egoistic theories. The class includes several cross-cultural theories such as Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Buddhist. Students scrutinize basic ethical dilemmas encountered in the work of being a psychologist, as well as engaging in the debate about what is moral, how we make choices about right and wrong, and the responsibilities counselors shoulder in giving advice and in their influence over another person's life.

PSY 3190A. Process & the Addiction Counselor. 3-4 Unit.

This course develops understanding and competency in the area of personal growth, development and awareness as an addiction treatment professional. This course also provides an understanding of interpersonal styles and limitations, reaction patterns, life-styles, transference, counter-transference and personal/professional balance. Students will gain greater awareness of the impact of self, including one?s unique personality characteristics on the developing relationship;enhance their ability to work in the here-and-now with the client, and; develop sensitivity to ethical issues and issues of diversity. This course is one of several expertise/skills courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3210. Small Group Process. 3-4 Unit.

Small groups are an inescapable and essential element of public and private lives. This course helps students understand: (a)why small groups are important;(b)how they develop and work; and (c)how an individual can have an impact on the course of action of a group.

PSY 3220A. Holistic Perspectives on Addiction. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3240A. Psychology of Happiness. 3-4.01 Unit.

PSY 3240B. Shakespeare Deconstructed: Gender and Power Play. 3-4.01 Unit.

PSY 3270A. Critical Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3310B. Postmodern Approaches to Addiction Treatment. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3330A. Eco-Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

Ecopsychology holds that human beings create a wellness for both themselves and for non-human beings through the process of connecting with nature. While ecopsychology itself is a relatively new development within mainstream psychology, the fields of wilderness therapy, adventure therapy, and therapeutic recreation provide a base of research, applied knowledge and experiential learning that extends back for more than 30 years. Through experiential exercises, students learn and practice skills to expand their ability to develop and maintain a deep connectedness with themselves, with others and with nature.

PSY 3340.LA. Psychological Aspects of Parenting. 3-4 Unit.

This course is designed to increase understanding of the psychological basis underlying common parenting practices, broaden the student's knowledge of available parenting techniques, and invite the student to consider maladaptive parenting practices that intensify difficulties in the parent-child relationship. The concept of equi-finality (the many different paths that can result in a healthy, functioning child) is stressed throughout the course.

PSY 3340A. Third Wave Therapies. 3-4.01 Unit.

PSY 3430.LA. Infant to Child Development. 3-4 Unit.

Knowledge of infant and child development is essential in developing an understanding of the needs and motivations of human beings. This course provides a basic working knowledge of the field of child development, focusing on emotional, cognitive, and social development from infancy to childhood. Various stages of development are explored, as well as psychological theories that emphasize the importance of the child-caretaker bond. Using empirical infant/child studies, students choose a topic and present their findings to the class. Students are required to participate in an infant observation based on the Resources for Infant Educarers (RIE) philosophy, at a time other than when the class is scheduled.

PSY 3460. Cross-Cultural Child Development. 3-4 Unit.

This class explores the socio-cultural matrix of infant development. Cultural universals and cultural variability are considered in terms of societal/parental expectations and interactive behavior with topics such as feeding, sleeping arrangements, attachment, separations, autonomy, sense of self, crying, playing, and risk. The physical development of the infant, emotional and cognitive theories of development, and student's own experience are investigated.

PSY 3500.LA. Prior Learning: Psychology. 0 Units.

PSY 3510. Independent Study - Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 3520. Family Systems. 3 Units.

PSY 3520A. Human Sexualities. 3-4 Unit.

This course deconstructs the issues of gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, and the concepts of normal and abnormal sexualities, all through a socio-cultural lens. Film presentations, class discussions, and interactive class exercises will engage students in exploring the development of their own sexual identities, while fostering an appreciation of the rich historical context of sex and sexuality in America throughout the past century. The many topics studied include patriarchy, fantasy, femaleness/maleness, intimacy, open relationships, family of origin discourses, eroticism, and LGBT issues.

PSY 3530. Internship: Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 3540. Interpersonal Communication in The Workplace. 3-4 Unit.

This course focuses on two-person relationships in both the personal and professional lives of managers and others in the workplace. Its goals are to improve students' awareness and competence in interpersonal relationships, including listening behavior.

PSY 3540A. Positive Psychology: Bldg Resilience To Trauma. 3-4 Unit.

Resilience, a now significant construct in psychology, education, sociology, and elsewhere, is best conceived in the context of preventative mental health, and has applications in personal relationships, families, classrooms, and school, with special relevance to children and adolescents in poverty. This course examines the factors shown to be associated with such successful adaptation and resistance in the face of oppression and how educators and psychologists can provide the types of experiences and environments that encourage these developments.

PSY 3560A. The Science of Psychopharmacology. 3-4 Unit.

This course assists students in developing an understanding of the science behind clinical drug therapies. Students explore the mechanism of action of drugs that affect the central nervous system and learn about their entry into the brain, their molecular targets and their global effects on the brain and behavior. Basic scientific models of disease, learning and addiction are used as discussion points to discover how drug therapies are developed using the scientific method.

PSY 3570A. Jungian Theories & Techniques. 3-4 Unit.

This course turns an evaluative eye on mainstream psychology, how it ignores power differences between social classes, and the resulting impact on the mental and physical well being of individuals and groups of people. Through reading, class discussion and exploratory research, this class will use a lens of intercultural awareness and social justice to deconstruct the hierarchies inherent in much of western psychology, and to identify alternative, culturally sensitive views of interpersonal relationship. *This is a highly recommended Gateway course for all Psychology Concentration students.

PSY 3580. Community Psychology: Context and Change. 3-4 Unit.

This course teaches students to develop skills in examining social problems and solutions from an ecological, multidimensional perspective. The relationships between problem definitions, solutions and the process of change are emphasized. Community Psychology theory, research, and action are applied to specific social issues such as homelessness, social oppression, poverty, and the destruction of our natural environment. Topics include primary prevention, empowerment, global issues, and roles for nonprofessionals in community psychology.

PSY 3590. Theories of Addiction. 3-4 Unit.

Students learn to differentiate and contrast medical, social, and psychological theories of addiction as well as hypothesize about integrated models. The course focuses on alcohol and drug abuse, but other addictive behaviors such as eating disorders, tobacco consumption, and sexual addiction are considered as well. Although not a course on treatment, students examine the relationships between theories and intervention practices.

PSY 3600. Sources of Creativity: Theory And Process. 3-4 Unit.

This class is designed to examine a variety of current psychological theories on creativity, as students apply this knowledge to music, art, writing, science, psychotherapy, and theatre. The course also focuses on creative blocks, burnout and breakdowns. The class includes discussion, reading and hands-on experience. SOCIAL.

PSY 3600A. Psychology of Couples in Fiction & Film. 3-4 Unit.

This course will explore the psychology of couples through the use of films and one classic American novel. It will examine the representation of couple relationships through a postmodern, social constructionist lens, deconstructing multiple discourses such as those of culture, gender, politics and patriarchy. The class will investigate what informs our understanding of normalcy, sexuality, heterosexism, monogamy, family and divorce. In addition, we will engage with ideas from psychotherapy in working clinically with couples. The class format will emphasize collaborative discussions, experiential exercises, and film viewing.

PSY 3630.LA. Psychology and Individuation in Soc. 4 Units.

PSY 3630A. Applications of Psychology in the 21st Century. 3-4 Unit.

This course will enrich the student's awareness of various applications of psychology and invite critical analysis of those applications. In addition to opportunities in teaching and counseling, we will consider some of the professional alternatives to areas of psychology frequently overlooked: advertising, criminal/forensic, industrial, military, organizational, school-based, sports and more. In addition to building an understanding of what these professional alternatives entail, we will assess them in academic terms (by querying how well their intentions and practices serve their target populations) and in personal terms (by examining how well they intersect with who you want to be in the world and what you value). To do so, we will engage the following questions: What does society need psychology for and how/well do these professional domains seem to meet these needs? Which practices engaged by these domains of psychology would you champion and which would you challenge? When is it useful to bring to the practice of psychology a more modern or more postmodern approach? How might Antioch's cultivation of critical skills, social awareness and community engagement be implemented in the particular workplace environments in which these domains are performed? And how well do these professional possibilities match up with what fascinates, motivates or inspires you? The class includes guest speakers, academic articles, papers, research and discussions.

PSY 3660A. Psychology of Addiction. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines the biological, psychological and social aspects associated with the phenomena of addiction and its clinical treatment. Traditional treatment approaches will be contrasted and compared to approaches derived from a strengths perspective, both in the U.S. and abroad. Course work will include an overview of the Limbic System Theory of Addiction as well as other pertinent areas of cognitive functioning and neurobiology. This course is one of several developed to provide the practical knowledge required for credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations.

PSY 3670B. The Narrative Method: Building Empathic. 3-4.01 Unit.

PSY 3690A. Group Facilitation for Addiction Counselors. 3-4 Unit.

This course is designed as an introduction to the dynamics of group interaction with the emphasis upon the individual?s firsthand experience as the group studies itself (under supervision). The factors involved in problems of communication, effective emotional responses, and personal growth will be highlighted. The emphasis will be on group process as a means of changing behavior. This course reviews the major goals, stages, and processes of group counseling in addiction treatment programs. The role, responsibilities, and ethics of the group leader are emphasized along with the strategies and techniques for facilitating group processes. Learners practice and demonstrate competencies through group leadership practice and participation as well as other measurable indicators, such as use of interventions learned. This course is one of several expertise/skills courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations. This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies.

PSY 3700.LA. Moral Psychology in the Dramatic Film. 3-4 Unit.

This course analyzes several dramatic films in class with the application of the theories of moral psychology of John Rawls, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Jean Piaget. Through class analyses and discussions, students will learn to apply these developmental and social contract theories. Films studied may include The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Mutiny on the Bounty, Babette's Feast, The Diaries of Adam and Eve, Born on The Fourth of July, Crimes and Misdemeanors, and Casablanca.

PSY 3710.LA. The Politics of Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

This course investigates the social, economic, and political contexts of the contemporary practice of psychology. Approaching the subject from a variety of disciplinary perspectives raises substantive questions concerning the role of psychologists in the politics of psychology. This course intends to broaden the horizons of understanding of the discipline's history, present day social practices, and future potential. *This is a highly recommended gateway course for all Psychology Concentration students.

PSY 3710C. Politics of Psychology. 4 Units.

PSY 3750. Concepts of Child Development. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3750A. Postmodern Group Therapy. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3800A. Psychology of Dramatic Writing & Identity Development. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 3830. Psychology of Women Through Literature and film. 3-4 Unit.

This course explores, through literature and film, a variety of the emotional and psychological experiences of women. Insights from works on the psychology of women by Jean Baker Miller and Phylis Chesler are brought to discussion of short novels, short stories, and films. Through literature and films students examine the relationship between patriarchal culture and differing psychological definitions of women and men's emotional life.

PSY 3830A. The Psychology of Consumer Behavior: Why We Buy. 3-4 Unit.

This course analyzes the psychological, sociological, and cultural variables that influence buying behavior. The focus is on how marketing strategies and the communication process impact the ways in which consumers perceive, select, and make purchases. Issues such as behavioral approaches to segmentation, social influence, the diffusion of innovation, learning, motivation, perception, attitudes, and decision making are explored.

PSY 3830B. Myth and the Psyche: Analysis of the Concept of Self. 3-4 Unit.

This class explores the fundamental concepts of the unconscious and the mythological journey of transformation that human beings experience as a part of the life process. The class explores the meaning and purpose of the inner, mythic journey to both society and the individual. It also examines mythological interpretations of universal themes and symbols found in various mythologies throughout the world both past and present and concepts presented by C.G. Jung in his analysis of the Self, including archetypal images and the collective unconscious. Through this study, the student will gain a better understanding of the process of the psychological journey and its power to create a sense of harmony and wholeness.

PSY 3840A. Social Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

In attempting to understand human beliefs and behavior, social psychology looks at the interrelationship between individuals and groups. Social psychology is rooted in Lewin's field theory, which examines how a person's behavior is impacted not just by the individual's personality but the surrounding social environment. This course explores how various aspects of social psychology help explain issues such as aggression and altruism as forms of social behavior, how attitudes are formed and their relationship to behavior, how we present the self and issues around self-esteem, social identity, prejudice and stereotypes. Students also attend to the impact of cross-cultural experiences on these themes.

PSY 3850. Adult Levels of Psycho-Sexual Development. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines constructivistic-interactionist theories of adult levels of psychosexual development along with psychoanalytic theory and evolutionary psychology. Psychological and philosophical issues are examined and films are reviewed and discussed to illustrate relational virtues and vices in adult psychosexual relationships. Case studies including those of Marie Curie and Paul Langevin, and John-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir are examined. Interviews with subjects are analyzed.

PSY 3850A. Psychology of Love As the Path to Wholeness. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines the concept of love in its myriad expressions, analyzing each within a context of its role in maintaining psychological wholeness and health. Students gain an appreciation for and understanding of the concept of love in its various meanings and expressions as well as its value to a healthy psyche (consciously and sub/unconsciously) to both antiquity as well as contemporary society. Love is recognized as the force of creation and the energy by which life continues to exert itself in its many manifestations. Students discern the myriad experiences of love and their expressions within a personal experience of self and among/between others.

PSY 3860A. Systems & Systems Thinking. 3-4 Unit.

This course presents principles of general systems theory and key aspects of their application in psychology, organizational units, urban development, education, and health care by analyzing the systemic nature of the human body, business, educational settings, family, and the modern city. The course develops systemic dispositions in students' personal and professional experiences by providing basic knowledge and skills essential for students to identify their lives and work environments as systems and to generate solutions for changing those environments effectively.

PSY 3900. Mic Check: This Is What a Social Movement Looks Like. 1 Unit.

PSY 3900AA. Urban Violence Traumatic Stress Syndrome (UVTS): Strategies for Educators and Clinicians. 1 Unit.

This interactive course explores the dynamics and impact of ongoing violence on children who live and attend school in war-like conditions. Psycho-neurological and develop-mental effects are explored, as well as associated cognitive and emotional stress responses. Recommended treatment techniques, and best practices for schools are presented and discussed.

PSY 3900AL. Social Justice & Advocacy Skills. 2 Units.

PSY 3900AN. Narrative Phototherapy. 1 Unit.

PSY 3900AQ. Transgender Identities: a Multicultural View of Gender Variance. 1 Unit.

This workshop visits unconventional lives of extraordinary people who transcend conventional concepts of gender identity: from the French Saint Joan of Arc to American icons Calamity Jane and Rupaul, from the galli of Mesopotamia and the hijra of India, to the Faafafine of Samoa, and others who are intersex, two-spirit, transvestic, etc. Through this safari of trans identity run patterns of hybrid beauty, leadership, and spiritual stewardship. Students have the opportunity to reevaluate and expand their understandings of gender identity in society. No grade equivalents allowed.

PSY 3900AU. Seeing the Glass Half Full: Asset-Based Community Development. 2 Units.

PSY 3900AZ. Introduction to Art Therapy. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 3900BA. Contemporary Exploration of Freudian Theory. 2 Units.

PSY 3900BB. Psychology of War, Trauma and Vets. 1 Unit.

What is the effect of war and trauma on the human psyche? What philosophical, psychological and spiritual ideas do humans use to reconstitute and re-story themselves after trauma? How do the experiences of combat and multiple traumas differ from single incident traumas? This one-day workshop will explore the impact of trauma along with current ideas regarding its treatment and integration into personal narratives. Students will develop greater understanding of and empathy for the survivors of trauma, combat veterans in particular, and identity diverse treatment modalities.

PSY 3900BC. Ericksonian Hypnosis: Theory & Practice. 1 Unit.

PSY 3900BD. Reclaiming Community Out of Catastrophe. 1 Unit.

Through video, audio, storytelling and group experiential work, students will explore and engage therapeutic practices that assist clients suffering from the effects of personal catastrophe. Built on ethical foundations of relationally responsible practices, students will analyze responses to personal catastrophe (natural disaster, family loss, suicide) that link individuals to naturally sustaining networks of support and offer profound possibilities for communal reciprocity and transformative healing. Peggy Sax is an international consultant, licensed psychologist, online study group host, and author of the book, Re-authoring Teaching: Creating a Collaboratory. Her passion is in facilitating transformative dialogues that build learning communities and transcend the barriers of geography, professional status, and other culturally imposed experiences of difference.

PSY 3900BE. Psycholgy of Soldiers, War & Trauma. 2 Units.

What is the effect of war and trauma on the human psyche? What is the process by which ordinary citizens are transformed in soldiers and how does this training and the experience of combat impact an individual's views of themselves, the world and the future? What philosophical, psychological and spiritual ideas do humans use to reconstitute and re-story themselves after trauma? This two-day workshop will explore the impact of trauma related to combat and military sexual assault along with current ideas regarding its treatment and integration into personal narratives. Students will develop greater understanding of and empathy for those who have served, and identify diverse viewpoints about the nature and treatment of trauma as they begin to formulate their own ideas about growth and renewal following unexpected or tragic events.

PSY 3900BF. Deconstructing Bullying. 2 Units.

PSY 3900CC. Narrative Medicine: Teaching Empathy Through Literature & Performance. 1 Unit.

PSY 3900R. Children in War: Special Topics in Psychology. 1-2 Unit.

This one-day workshop explores the ways that war impacts the psychosocial well-being of children, their families, and communities. The topic covers children who currently reside in war, as well as children who are refugees. Workshop participants develop practical plans of action in prevention, emergency intervention, and rehabilitation for war-affected children. No grade equivalents allowed.

PSY 3910. Theories and Treatment of Learning Disabilities. 3 Units.

PSY 3910A. Integrating Addiction Counseling Proficiencies. 3-4 Unit.

This course is designed to address the needs of students with no prior addiction treatment training as well as provide appropriately challenging coursework that will offer upper division scholarship for an advanced education in addiction studies. This course will demonstrate the need, regardless of professional identity or discipline, for each helping professional working with an addicted population to have a basic understanding of addiction that includes knowledge of current models and theories, appreciation of the multiple contexts within which substance use occurs, and awareness of the effects of psychoactive drug use. This course also addresses the need for each professional to be knowledgeable about the continuum of care and the social contexts affecting the treatment and recovery process. In 1998, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration published Addiction Counseling Competencies: The Knowledge Skills and Attitudes of Professional Practice TAP 21. This course will explore the 123 competencies of the TAP 21 from a strength-based perspective and seek to identify dominant discourses that may support or interfere with transformation and healing for those challenged by addiction. This course is one of several core courses developed (special attention paid to TAP 21 criteria) to provide the practical knowledge required for successfully navigating credentialing (Certified Addiction Treatment Counselor) examinations.

PSY 3920A. Madness in American History and Film. 3 Units.

This course will explore the history and cinematic representation of madness in America, inviting the students' critical analysis of the ethical, psychological and political effects in the treatment of insanity from 1750 to the present. An interactive and collaborative class format will be utilized, with discussion of weekly readings and film presentations. Topics to be explored include European influences, ethical dilemmas, the emergence of asylums, treatment pioneers, humane/inhumane practices, scientific and political imperatives, creation of the DSM, and interpersonal challenges within the individual, the family and the culture at large.

PSY 3920B. Documentary Film & the American Psyche. 3-4.01 Unit.

PSY 3950. The Bodymind Therapies. 3-4 Unit.

This course explores the seminal works of Selver, Todd and Rolf as well as Reich, Lowen, Alexander, Trager and Painter. The unique mind-body techniques of hypnotism and meditation are also considered. Through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations students learn how each theory and method seeks to integrate body, mind, emotion, and spirit.

PSY 4030A. Proseminar on Research. 3-4 Unit.

This sponsored independent study will engage in the structural-developmental research study of generosity. Theories of moral, ethical and spiritual virtues will be researched. Pilot research projects will be conducted.

PSY 4040. Philosophical and Psychological Issues of Adult Development. 4-5 Unit.

This course presents a case-study approach to the examination of adult levels of decision-making, choice of personal philosophy, and conceptions of liberties, rights, duties, and obligations. Case studies include the ideas of former California Supreme Court Chief Justice Rose Bird, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Bishop Desmond Tutu, Georgia State Senator Julian Bond, and philosophers Simone de Beauvoir and Jean Paul Sartre.

PSY 4050. Psychology of Leadership. 3-4 Unit.

What is leadership and why is it important? Is leadership a matter of power or authority? What makes a leader - virtues, charisma, or position? Are leaders about goodness, justice, or mere efficacy? This course is designed to explore the theoretical aspects of leadership from several disciplinary perspectives and to understand how theory applies to real situations. Topics include leadership models, leader behavior and skills, followership, teams and motivation, social and ethical responsibilities, and leading with creativity. Students are expected to analyze cases, current situations and their own leadership style.

PSY 4080A. Relational Approaches to Counseling. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 4090. Research Design and Methodology. 4-5 Unit.

The course introduces students to experimental and non-experimental designs used in psychological research. Class time is divided between discussion of the reading material and laboratory work. Students discuss commonly used designs, the elements of these designs, and the benefits of each type of design. Students get hands-on experience with several studies, serving as subjects in these studies, analyzing the data, and writing reports on the research using an APA-style format. Students are involved in designing their own studies, gathering data, analyzing the data, and presenting this information both in oral and written form. Prerequisite: MAT 403/PSY 414 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics.

PSY 4110A. Selected Research Issues in Ethical and Spiritual Development of Compassion. 3-4 Unit.

This course engages the structural-developmental research study of ethical compassion in decision making. Theories of moral, ethical, and spiritual virtues are presented. Expected research relationships between moral and ethical judgment questionnaires developed by Kohlberg and Erdynast are discussed as are general relationships between levels of moral development and levels of spiritual development. The social contract, structural-developmental conception of compassion presumes capacity for several levels of compassion within individuals and across different individuals.

PSY 4140. Descriptive and Inferential Statistics. 4 Units.

This course concentrates on the application of statistical methods to research problems. Statistical methods such as correlation analysis, t-tests, and analysis of variance are applied to research designs. In addition, students learn how to utilize computer programs to solve statistical problems.

PSY 4180. Integrating Addiction Counseling Modalities. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 4230. Social and Ethical Issues in Management. 4 Units.

In this course, the case study method is employed to examine contemporary organizational problems that concern rights, responsibilities, justice, and liberties. Topics include affirmative action, employee rights, testing in the workplace, AIDS in the workplace, maternity/paternity leave, fraud, bribery, kickbacks, and environmental issues. Landmark U.S. and State Supreme Court decisions are analyzed from the perspectives of dominant ethical theories, such as those of Bentham, Hume, Mill, Kant, and Rawls.

PSY 4240. Contemporary Issues in Adolescent Development. 4-5 Unit.

This course explores issues faced by adolescents as they navigate the developmental trajectory from childhood to adulthood, focusing on issues that impact the social, emotional and psychological development of youth in the United States. Topics include: influence of the media and the commercialization of youth, academic performance and achievement, schools, peer relationships, sex and sexuality, youth violence and victimization, juvenile justice, diversity of identities, and preparation for the challenges of adulthood.

PSY 4250. Global Approaches to Normal & Abnormal Psychology. 3 Units.

In this course, a critical and global perspective on abnormal psychology is presented through consideration of methods of conceptualizing the individual, concepts of normality vs. abnormality, subjectivity vs. objectivity, and the medical model vs. the humanistic-existential model.

PSY 4250FR. The Integration Between Buddhism and Psychology: East & West Join in France. 3 Units.

PSY 4250JA. Japanese Approaches to Mindfulness & Mental Health. 3 Units.

PSY 4270A. Transgender Identities. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 4300. The Psychology of the Higher Emotions. 4 Units.

This course explores Buddhist psychological methods for dismantling patterns of suffering and cultivating loving-kindness, compassion, equanimity and sympathetic joy. These higher emotions are known as the Four Immeasurables. Students are introduced to a basic meditation practice and assigned readings in preparation for a 3 1/2 day residential retreat. Instruction draws upon central Buddhist concepts and themes giving students a broad view of Buddhist perspectives with an emphasis on practical self-experiencing. The Retreat itself includes lecture, sitting and walking meditation, processing and extended periods of noble silence.

PSY 4330. Cognitive Psychology: Children's Thinking. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines current and historical views of the development of problem-solving skills, language skills, and conceptual abilities in children. Through work with these topics, the student is introduced to central issues and concepts in cognitive psychology.

PSY 4340A. Contemporary Neuro-Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

This course proposes models for relating brain dysfunction and/or damage to observable empirically describable psychological behavior. Basic concepts covered are: the relationship between brain and behavior, lateralization of brain function, emotions, and the neuro-psychology of development and aging. The course also considers a number of neuro-pathologies: neuro-linguistic problems, apraxias, memory problems, and the neuro-psychology of drug abuse.

PSY 4510. Independent Study: Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 4530. Internship: Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 4540. School and Community-Based Interventions with Children. 4 Units.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the range of school and community-based interventions available for school-aged children. Through readings, lecture, video presentations and discussions students are expected to develop an understanding of: 1) approaches to intervention with young children in school settings; 2) approaches to intervention with young children in community settings; and 3) how school and community approaches to interventions with children can be integrated for maximum efficacy.

PSY 4580A. Spiritual Psychologies & Psychotherapies. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 4640A. Introduction to Postmodern Psychotherapies. 3-4 Unit.

In this interactive, collaborative class (readings, discussions, DVD presentations, and dyadic exercises) students learn the underlying assumptions, the working principles, and the basic practices of doing resource-oriented, Postmodern Therapy. Specific models examined are Solution-Focused Therapy and Narrative Therapy, both with an underlying perspective based in Social Constructionist thought.

PSY 4710. Mark Twain: Personal Philosophy and Moral Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

This course studies Mark Twain as a social critic and moral educator and examines the personal philosophy that he brought to his writings. In context of Rawls' moral psychology, course topics include Twain's critiques of moral determinism, conventional religion, creationism, as well as the moral sense in human morality, adultery, hypocrisy, patriotism, superstition, religious intolerance and persecution.

PSY 4730. Psychedelics Revisioned: The Cultural Politics of Consciousness. 4 Units.

This course investigates the social, cultural, economic, and political contexts of the contemporary status of psychedelics in the West. Charting a critically oriented path between fear and ignorance on one hand,and unbridled enthusiasm on the other, this course studies issues related to psychedelics from a variety of disciplinary perspectives (History, Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Psychology, Religion and Philosophy) raising substantive questions concerning the place of psychedelics specifically in contemporary America, also in the world more broadly. This course is designed to critically engage and broaden the horizons of understanding of the history, present day practices, and future potential of psychedelics.

PSY 4850. Art of Relationship in Tibetan Buddhism. 4 Units.

This psychologically based course utilizes a meditation retreat format to explore awakening as an organizing principle of relationship. The Heart Sutta is Mahayana Buddhism's most celebrated text and most profound philosophical statement. Students learn to use this time-honored guide as well as profound Tibetan Teachings on relationship to come to know and improve their relationships with others and with themselves. These teachings are especially useful for those seeking completeness within or for those wishing to deepen a lifelong love relationship with another.

PSY 4900AC. Lgbt Sexual Identity Development: Diversity and the Multi-Layered Self. 1 Unit.

This class will explore how we see ourselves and others, how we came to see ourselves that way, and why it matters. To this end we will be learning various LGBT-affirmative models of sexual identity development (many of which are based on racial and cultural identity development processes) and discussing their practicality or lack thereof in the lived experiences of LGBT individuals. Through lecture, film, audio vignettes, exercises and lots of discussion, we will work to understand the multiple layers of identity, how they interact with each other, and how they impact the overall developmental process. No grade equivalents allowed.

PSY 4900AG. Divine Madness. 1 Unit.

PSY 4900AS. The Creative Arts & Psychotherapy. 1 Unit.

Increasingly, mental health practitioners are using various arts in conjunction with therapy. This workshop examines how visual arts, movement, and theater improvisation techniques can be incorporated into the therapeutic practice as positive healing tools in processing emotions, experience, and behaviors. As a result of looking at both theoretical and practical applications of these creative means, we will explore the benefits of using these new tools in therapy. A portion of the day will be spent with hands-on experience, not only to allow students to grasp the power of these tools, but also to afford students the practice of facilitating these new means. No grade equivalents allowed.

PSY 4900H. Grief and Loss. 1 Unit.

PSY 4900P. Disaster Psychology: Acute Stress Management. 2 Units.

This two-day experiential workshop explores the theories and practical applications of emergency mental health for widespread disasters. Participants learn how to recognize and effectively manage normal and maladaptive reactions to extreme stress in themselves and in others. Through examples of real past events and related emergency responses, quick-write exercises, and role-plays, students learn psychological crisis management approaches for individuals, small groups, and whole communities.

PSY 4900R. David Epston: Master Class in Narrative Therapy. 1 Unit.

PSY 4900W. Re-Membering Skills & Practices:. 2 Units.

Redefining Grief & Loss.

PSY 4950. The Psychological Teachings of the Historical Buddha. 4 Units.

PSY 5000. Clinical Training Orientation. 0 Units.

This meeting provides initial orientation to the Clinical Training process, presenting AULA's clinical training requirements, California Board of Behavioral Sciences requirements for MFT licensure, and processes and resources for finding a clinical training site. Students also meet with representatives from AULA-approved clinical training sites to learn about the variety and diversity of training opportunities that are available. Required for all first quarter MFT students; a prerequisite for entering Clinical Training.

PSY 5000A. Pre-Enrollment Requirements for Clinical Training. 0 Units.

This meeting provides a detailed review of forms and procedures students must follow in registering for AULA clinical training units, earning hours, and meeting trainee requirements of the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners. Required for MFT Concentration students in or prior to the quarter before entering clinical training; a prerequisite for entering clinical training.

PSY 5000AA. Clinical Readiness. 0 Units.

This course is designed to assess students' readiness to enter clinical training and serve as a bridge between introductory, didactic coursework and applied experiences in applied clinical work. In addition, this course will aid students in learning about the various facets of applying to and securing a clinical training placement. Various components of professional development will also be addressed through discussion and roleplay modalities.

PSY 5000C. Professional Development Seminar: Life After Graduation. 0 Units.

PSY 5000W. Writing for Graduate School and Beyond. 0 Units.

The five week long MAP Academic Writing Workshop introduces new graduate psychology students to the process of writing in an academic format and style. The workshop familiarizes the student with techniques for crafting academic essays and papers using American Psychological Association style (including correct citation and reference applications), structure, and scholarly research (developing research questions, locating peer reviewed journal articles, etc.). In addition, it instructs students in various techniques for creating and supporting their ideas. The course enforces what steps a student needs engage in when writing a paper, and will enrich their ability to write for their careers within the graduate psychology program and beyond. Writing is a craft requiring a multi-tiered process. Through this seminar, students will understand writing as a craft, along with developing good working habits, skills, and methods to assist in their academic endeavors.

PSY 5010A. Process of Interpersonal Psychotherapy I. 2-3 Unit.

This course introduces principles and skills involved in providing relational psychotherapy. Goals of therapy, initial contact, gaining rapport, the therapeutic relationship, the therapist's own motives and personal issues, and the sources of therapeutic change are topics of study. Students develop skills through role play and dyadic work with classmates. Required for MFT Concentration students; a prerequisite for entering clinical training.

PSY 5010D. History and Systems of Psychology. 3 Units.

PSY 5010E. Introduction to Clinical Process. 1 Unit.

The therapist is a healing presence. He/she creates a feeling of safety and openness that allows healing to take place. No matter what the therapist's theoretical orientation, the client will have the most success when he/she feels safe and has the experience of being heard. The reading, discussions and exercises in this workshop will explore what the therapist brings to his/her work that fosters healing, growth and change. The focus is on the therapist rather than the client. We will turn our attention to creating and maintaining a safe space and learning the basics of active, reflective, compassionate listening as the foundation for doing therapy.

PSY 5060. Career Development I. 4 Units.

PSY 5060A. Organizational Behavior: People in Organizations. 4 Units.

PSY 5060D. Planned Change and Organizational Development. 4 Units.

PSY 5060E. Career Development I. 3 Units.

PSY 5060F. Career Development II. 2 Units.

This course will focus on the application of career development theory through the use of counseling processes, interventions and resources applicable in today's global economy. Students will become more familiar with various standardized tests and assessment tools used in career counseling and educational planning with a critical eye to their effectiveness and limitations when working with diverse populations. Additionally, students will gain the ability to find sources of occupational information and determine the status of current research in the field of career development. Students will be involved in practical exercises and projects to demonstrate their ability to design, deliver and evaluate comprehensive guidance and interventions. The format of instruction for this course is online.

PSY 5090. Brief Therapy. 2-3 Unit.

This course articulates some of the basic processes, principles and techniques of doing brief therapy from cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused and narrative perspectives. Focus is on understanding the premises and usefulness of each approach and on developing brief therapy skills through role-play and work with case material. This course may be elected to partly fulfill the Clinical Skill Development requirement in the MFT Concentration. Prerequisites: PSY 501A.

PSY 5100. Introduction to Psychotherapy Theory and Practice. 0 Units.

This course, required for incoming students who do not have a recent Bachelor's degree in psychology, provides an overview of psychology. Particular emphasis is given to developmental, abnormal psychology and the history of psychology.

PSY 5120. Communication Skills for Psychotherapists. 1 Unit.

This online independent study course is designed to broaden students' awareness of the diverse people and communities with which they will work as future professionals in psychology. A further goal is broadening awareness of self in society. Students select community settings of interest, carry out interviews and field visits, and share learning with classmates and faculty through dialogue on First Class, the Antioch conferencing and e-mail system. Required for all MAP students entering 1/98 or later, in the second quarter of study.

PSY 5120A. Field Study: Psychology and Society. 2-3 Unit.

This course is designed to broaden students' awareness of the diverse people and communities with which they will work as future professionals in psychology. A further goal is broadening awareness of self in society. Students select community settings of interest, carry out interviews and field visits, and share learning with classmates and faculty instructor through classroom dialogue or on Antioch University's email network. Required for all MAP students; best taken in the second or third quarter of study. Students must attend initial hour long face to face meeting, generally held the first Saturday of the quarter. One may not take the online course if they cannot attend the meeting.

PSY 5120B. Field Study in Applied Community Psychology. 2-3 Unit.

This course provides Applied Community Psychology students with the opportunity to work directly with a community agency on a project involving program development, evaluation, consultation, collaboration, psychoeducational group and/or in-service training development. Prerequisites include corresponding core courses (e.g., students engaged in field study involving program development and evaluation must successfully complete PSY 545E prior to enrolling in field study). Students in the Applied Community Psychology Specialization are required to complete two units of field study but may enroll in one unit at a time. Prerequisites: 545C and the appropriate one of the following: 545D, 545E, 575E.

PSY 5120C. Advanced Field Study in Community Psychology. 1-4 Unit.

PSY 5120D. LGBT Community Action. 2 Units.

PSY 5120GFS. Global Field Study. 3-4 Unit.

The literature is replete with research that shows developing multicultural competence is an essential task for contemporary psychotherapists. It also shows that cultural immersion experiences are among the best ways to develop and enhance this competence. In service of this as a best practice in the field, we have developed an overseas service learning/cultural immersion opportunity via WorldTeach's summer teach abroad program. The course includes a two month stay in a foreign country (China, Ecuador, Morocco, Nepal, or Poland) during which participants will teach English to under-resourced children and adults while living with local families. In order to participate in this course, learners must apply to and be accepted into the WorldTeach Summer Teach Abroad Program (worldteach.org).

PSY 5140A. Photoanalysis in Clinical Practice. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5140C. Career Development & Life Planning. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5160B. The Emotional Elements and Psychic Realities of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 1 Unit.

PSY 5160D. Therapeutic Issues in Managing Traumatic Stress and Anger. 2-3 Unit.

PSY 5160G. Secondary Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. 1 Unit.

PSY 5160H. The Neurobiology of Trauma. 1 Unit.

PSY 5190K. Gay Male Identity: Sex, Love, Intimacy, & Other Clinical & Community Issues. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5190L. Constructing a Relational Framework for Lgbt Affirmative Psychotherapy. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5200A. Developmental Psychopathology I: Diagnosis. 3-4 Unit.

This class introduces students to the clinical assessment of young people from infancy through adolescence, with emphasis on the construction of diagnostic and assessment questions founded in an understanding of developmental processes. This course includes discussions of criteria for mental health and illness in childhood and adolescence, as well as the philosophy and use of the DSM-IV with young people. Demonstrations and exercises help the student understand how therapists handle various problems of assessment from a developmental perspective that is sensitive to issues of culture and the position of the child and/or adolescent in society. Generally offered in Spring Quarter. Required for students in MFT Child Studies Specialization; may also be open to others. Prerequisite: PSY 543C.

PSY 5200B. Developmental Psychopathology II: Intervention. 3-4 Unit.

Building on developmentally and culturally sensitive diagnosis, this class explores a broad spectrum of treatment interventions for children and adolescents in society. Consideration is given to individual and family methods of psychological treatment as well as to community interventions and interventions in the school context. The aim is to provide the student with a broad, developmentally informed, culturally sensitive spectrum of intervention possibilities. Generally offered in Summer Quarter. Required for students in MFT Child Studies Specialization; may also be open to others. Prerequisites: PSY 520A and 543C.

PSY 5200C. Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (pcit): An Early Childhood Evidence-Based Treatment. 1 Unit.

Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), is an evidence-based treatment model that fosters strengthening of the parent- child relationship and develops parent?s ability to appropriately manage child?s maladaptive behaviors. When young children are exposed to traumatic events such as physical and emotional abuse, several domains in their development may be impacted. Trauma affects children?s cognitive, social and emotional development as well as children?s relationships with their caregivers, especially when the trauma consists of physical or emotional abuse. PCIT gives parents the opportunity to learn, practice, and master specific parenting skills to manage and subsequently reduce their children?s acting out behaviors. At the same time PCIT promotes building social and emotional competence, such as taking turns, sharing, decreasing impulse control, and increasing frustration tolerance. The treatment consists of two phases: Child Directed Interaction (CDI) and Parent Directed Interaction (PDI). CDI portion of PCIT focuses on relationship enhancement skills, while PDI addresses age appropriate management of children?s maladaptive behaviors. This workshop will assist students in developing an understanding of PCIT concepts and the unique ways in which PCIT is suited to improve relationship between parents and children. It will also address the cultural barriers and considerations when using PCIT with different ethnic groups.

PSY 5210A. Sexual Transference and Countertransference. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5210D. Transference/Countertransference: Eros And Psyche. 3 Units.

PSY 5210E. Black Women's Psyche: an Exploration Into Complexity (sdp). 2 Units.

This workshop focuses on the ways in which psychotherapists are consciously and unconsciously aware of their relationship to and with Black women, defined here as women who claim a racial, cultural or ethnic identity linked to the African diaspora. Thus, this definition recognizes that Black women's identities and corresponding psyches are not universal. Rather, there exists a complex-and often complicated-way in which these women are recognized and understood by themselves as well as by the broader society. The workshop explores the distinctions between archetypal representations and social stereotypes, as well as cultural complexes, shadow presentations and defense mechanisms frequently associated with the Black woman's psyche. Through interactive experiences, discussion, self reflection and writing, the workshop aims to increase participant's understanding of their own values and beliefs as they relate to Black women. The class will help delineate best practices for establishing a strong therapeutic alliance, whether inter-culturally or intra-culturally. Therefore, this workshop seeks to increase key skills and knowledge necessary quality psychotherapy for Black women.

PSY 5220. Effects of Trauma on Human Development & Neurobiology; Social History & Current Issues (tra). 2 Units.

PSY 5220A. Perspectives: Trauma & Its Effects, Awareness & Recovery. 3-4.01 Unit.

This survey course introduces the student to the*complex issues of trauma, trauma healing, and*transformation. Students will learn about the*biopsychosocial/spiritual model which helping*professionals can employ to help individuals who*have experienced deep personal loss, violent*conflict, pain and suffering. Students will*explore the theoretical bases of trauma healing*through narratives and case examples from a*variety of clinical settings and engage in*practical exercises to experience approaches to*the treatment of trauma from awareness to*recovery.

PSY 5220ACR. Perspectives: Trauma and Its Effects, Awareness, and Recovery. 3 Units.

This class introduces students to the issues of trauma healing and transformation. Students will examine the biopsychosocial/spiritual theories used in healing trauma and will explore the theoretical bases of trauma through narratives and case examples from a variety of clinical settings and through various class exercises. Students will be able to identify proper theories and treatments recognized by leaders in the field of trauma studies, and will be able to understand the best healing techniques available for individuals who have experienced trauma.

PSY 5220ACT. Perspectives: Trauma and Its Effects, Awareness, and Recovery. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the issues of trauma healing and transformation. Students will examine the biopsychosocial/spiritual treatments used in healing people who have experienced trauma, suffering and loss. Additionally, they will explore the theoretical bases of trauma through narratives and case examples from a variety of clinical settings and through various class exercises. Students will be able to address the issues of trauma, identify proper theories and treatments recognized by leaders in the field of trauma studies, will be able to understand the best healing techniques available for individuals who have experienced trauma.

PSY 5220B. Treatment of Trauma & Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5220BCR. Treatment of Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the treatment methods and needs of individuals suffering from symptoms characteristic of emotional trauma (Acute Stress Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)). This course also addresses assessment and intervention skills to work effectively with diverse populations using biopsychosocial and ecosystemic constructs. Specific techniques surveyed will include play therapy, biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral, narrative, virtual reality treatment, and crisis interventions.

PSY 5220BCT. Treatment of Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the treatment methods and needs of individuals suffering from symptoms characteristic of emotional trauma (Acute Stress Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)). This course also addresses assessment and intervention skills to work effectively with diverse populations using biopsychosocial and ecosystemic constructs. Specific techniques surveyed will include play therapy, biofeedback, cognitive-behavioral, narrative, virtual reality treatment, and crisis interventions.

PSY 5220C. Conflict Resolution, & Secondary Posttraumatic Stess Disorder (PTSD) & Self-Care Issues for Mental Health Professionals. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5220CCR. Conflict Resolution and Secondary Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd) and Self-Care Issues for Mental Health Professionals. 3 Units.

This course provides participants with an interdisciplinary overview of conflict analysis and resolution. Contending theories and approaches to understanding conflict and resolution processes will be emphasized. Issues impacting causation, escalation, and de-escalation including issues of power, culture, gender, and social location will be considered. Specific methods of analysis and intervention will be applied to relevant case studies. Particular attention will be given to understanding the common roles assumed by the helping professional in conflict resolution (e.g. facilitator, mediator, and advocate) and the deleterious effects of chronic exposure to conflict and trauma including secondary and vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue.

PSY 5220D. Holographic Reprocessing: A Cognitive Experiential Treatment for Trauma. 1 Unit.

PSY 5230D. Employee Assistance Programs: A Career Path for Psychotherapists. 1 Unit.

PSY 5240A. Nurturing the Nurturer: Self-Care Techniques to Prevent Burnout for Clinical Therapists. 1 Unit.

This workshop is designed for students currently in clinical training, or prior to clinical training. Burnout can be a significant issue amongst psychology graduate students in clinical training. Skills learned will be to identify symptoms of burnout, such as emotional exhaustion, depersonalization of clients, and loss of feeling personal accomplishment. Burnout can also be marked by increased cynicism towards clients, a loss of motivation towards one's current training and future career, and can possibly impact one's overall self-concept and self-efficacy. This course considers the stressors of clinical training, including the potential emotional impact of being a new trainee, finding balance between clinical practice, school, and personal life, one-way intimacy with clients, countertransference and vicarious traumatization. Self-care will be thoroughly explored by looking at the six self-care domains: social, cognitive, behavioral, physical, spiritual and occupational, including an introduction to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). This course serves as an elective for Spiritual and Depth Psychology (SDP) and Conflict and Other Related Trauma (CRT).

PSY 5250BR. Spirituality in Clinical Pract. 3-4 Unit.

Spirituality in Clinical Practice: Medicine and Psychology is an international course offered by AULA MAP (Master of Arts of Psychology Program) with the objectives of: introducing students to clinical practice according to a transdisciplinary approach in outpatient healthcare, with the integration of Medicine, Psychology, and Spirituality at Pineal Mind Instituto de Sade; and fostering self-development as global citizens. This course will focus on clinical cases of dissociative mental disorders that were unresponsive or presented poor prognosis from traditional medical and mental health treatment approaches. This course encompasses classroom lectures, clinical learning, field study, and intensive intercultural exchange with patients and treatment team members from diverse socio-economic, human diversity, ethnic, cultural, spiritual, and religious backgrounds.

PSY 5250FR. The Integration of Buddhism & Psychology: East & West Join in France (SDP). 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5250G. Working With Refugee Populations: Cultural Perspective Series. 1 Unit.

PSY 5250GB. Tavistock & Portman Training: Psychodynamic Approaches to Working With Adults. 2 Units.

Building on the foundational knowledge gained in Personality I, the training at Tavistock aims to provide exemplary instruction in additional theoretical concepts and training in their application in psychodynamic psychotherapy. As the application of psychoanalytic thinking is advanced students will learn to apply it to their personal lives, professional development, and clinical practice. The Tavistock training will include lectures, Tavistock's work discussion groups and a final professional development seminar. In addition to the training agenda created in consultation with the Tavistock faculty, there will be a pre-departure meeting, pre-training reading and journaling.

PSY 5250JA. Japanese Approaches to Mindfulness & Mental Health (SDP). 3 Units.

PSY 5250L. Working With Transgender Issues: Cultural Perspective Series. 1 Unit.

This workshop explores gender identity issues as related to working in therapy with transsexuals, individuals who are transgendered and cross-dressers, their families and significant others. Through lecture, video and guest presentations, we examine the complex and multi-faceted issues facing people in this culture whose experience of gender may not fit into the distinct, polarized categories of male or female. We examine some cross-cultural material to understand other and often less rigid ways of conceptualizing gender and consider how these can be incorporated into a therapeutic paradigm for working with this population.

PSY 5250W. African American Psychology. 1 Unit.

This workshop introduces students to present and historical psychosocial challenges facing African-American people that often influence mental health, as well as coping mechanisms, strengths and resources. Against this background the workshop considers distinctive elements of African-American psychology, and key considerations when making clinical interventions with African-American people.

PSY 5250Z. Rinzai Zen: Mindfulness & Stress Reduction (SDP). 1 Unit.

The intersection between contemporary psychology and classical Buddhist ideas about the mind and mindfulness have been an area of considerable interest over the last decade. Interventions that grow out of classical Buddhist approaches (including Zen meditation) continue to grow in popularity. For instance, Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy has become the treatment of choice for prevention of recurrent depression in Great Britain (http://oxfordmindfulness.org/). In the United States many universities and medical schools, including University of Massachusetts and University of Pennsylvania, have created mindfulness-based stress reduction programs. This workshop will return to the source material for these interventions by exploring a new technique that grows directly out of classical Japanese mindfulness. It will focus on a contemporary applications of classical Zen mindfulness principles as a tool for stress reduction as developed by Takafumi Kawakami, Vice-Abbot of the Shunkoin Temple in Kyoto. Shunkoin is affiliated with the Rinzai School of Buddhism. Rinzai mindfulness practice can include reflecting upon koans (paradoxical questions or statements), samu (physical work done mindfully) and zazen (seated meditation). The day will focus on zazen practice.

PSY 5310A. Personality Theory I: Psychodynamic Theories. 3-4 Unit.

This course is an introduction to modern psychodynamic theories of personality, beginning with Freudian and Jungian foundations, and continuing with study of self-psychology and object-relations approaches. The focus is on basic assumptions and concepts of significant theorists, with attention also to application in clinical practice. This course is required for all MAP students.

PSY 5310H. Intercultural Transpersonal and Depth Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5310J. Life As Practice: Inner Work, Social Responsibility, and Community Service. 2-3 Unit.

PSY 5320. Contemporary Theories of Personality. 2 Units.

In this course, students survey theoretical issues and clinical applications of selected humanistic, existential, modern psychoanalytic, cognitive-behavioral and transpersonal approaches to psychology and psychotherapy. Required for all students.

PSY 5320A. Personality Theory II: Comparative Contemporary Theories. 3-4 Unit.

This course surveys theoretical issues and clinical applications of selected humanistic, existential, cognitive-behavioral, narrative and transpersonal approaches to psychology and psychotherapy. Attention is also given to postmodern alternatives to traditional personality theories as a basis for clinical work. Prerequisite: PSY 531A. This course is required for all MAP students.

PSY 5320B. Advances in Personality Theory: Emerging Perspectives in Spiritual & Depth Psychology. 1 Unit.

PSY 5330. Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy. 2-3 Unit.

This course surveys contemporary cognitive and behavioral approaches to psychotherapy. In addition to underlying theoretical principles, emphasis is given to application, such as behavior modification and cognitive-behavioral approaches to anxiety disorders and depression. Prerequisites: PSY 501A and PSY 532A.

PSY 5330B. Brain and Behavior: the Child. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides an orientation to current understandings of genetic, environmental, and biological bases of child and adolescent disorders, with particular emphasis on understanding brain mechanisms that may underlie psychological problems. Emphasis is also placed on current approaches to drug therapies for children and adolescents, to demonstrate how and where medications can contribute to effective treatment. Frequently voiced philosophical, ethical, and legal concerns regarding biological factors and drug treatments for young people are discussed, along with the risks and benefits of drug therapies. Generally offered in Winter Quarter. Required for students in MFT Child Studies Specialization; may be open to others. Prerequisite: PSY 543C.

PSY 5330E. Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy. 3 Units.

PSY 5330K. Mindfulness in Clinical Practice. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5330L. Introduction to Classical Mindfulness- Based Cbt for the Treatment of Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5330M. Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP): An Evidence-Based Treatment for Young Children (CS). 1 Unit.

PSY 5330P. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. 2-3 Unit.

This course surveys Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) theory, a therapeutic approach developed by Dr. Marsha Linehan. In addition to underlying theoretical principles, emphasis is given to application, including the core modules such as mindfulness, emotion regulation, distress tolerance and interpersonal effectiveness. The history and development of DBT will be surveyed, including contributions made by Marsha Linehan, as well as how to treat diverse populations, including Borderline Personality Disorder, using this approach.

PSY 5350. Systems Theories and the Family. 3-4 Unit.

This course presents an introduction to systems thinking, with emphasis on using the systems perspective in understanding family issues and working with families in clinical practice. The approaches of leading family therapists are explored, including observation of their work on videotape and examining their understanding of family interaction patterns. Students preparing for clinical practice are encouraged to consider applications to individual and family therapy; students preparing for applied community psychology careers are encouraged to consider applications to organizations and larger systems. This course is required for all MAP students.

PSY 5350C. Treatment of Families. 2-3 Unit.

This course considers practical and theoretical issues in the treatment of families with an emphasis on family systems approaches. The instructor may focus on one or more family-systems theory, considering family dynamics, techniques with typical family problems, varieties of families, and development of the student's own competence as a therapist. Prerequisite: PSY 535. This course may be elected to partly fulfill the Clinical Skill Development requirement in the MFT Concentration.

PSY 5350K. Advanced Family Systems. 2 Units.

PSY 5350M. Systems Theory & the Family II. 2 Units.

This course will focus on case conceptualization, assessment and treatment of individuals, couples and the family utilization systems theory. Through lecture, discussion, in class experiences and the assigned tasks, students will be asked to broaden their systemic view to include the larger community and cultural social systems. Particular focus will be on the students? increasing awareness of their own position in society and the impact of their the work with client families. Students will also be exposed to diverse diagnostic issues as it may appear in a diverse population.

PSY 5350T. Systems Theories and the Family II. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5360A. Research and Professional Writing. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides an orientation to research methodology for the clinician, focusing on developing competence for using and understanding professional literature throughout a clinical career. Computer access to library resources is demonstrated. The course focuses on basic concepts for research in psychology, the meaning of common statistical procedures, critical thinking about research designs and conclusions, and identifying biases in psychological research. Each student evaluates clinical research studies reported in psychological journals; participates in the design of research on a subject of interest; and prepares a brief review of professional literature on a societally-focused topic in psychology, demonstrating mastery of American Psychological Association format. Required for all MAP students. Students should take this course in the second or third quarter of study.

PSY 5360D. Research for Mental Health Professionals. 3 Units.

PSY 5360E. Research for Evidence Based Practices. 3-4 Unit.

After successfully completing PSY 536D and its introduction to research methods and research design in mental health, this course provides an intermediate engagement to research methodology for the mental health professional. focusing on developing competence in using and understanding professional literature throughout a clinical career. Computer access to library resources is demonstrated. The course focuses on basic concepts for research in psychology, the meaning of common statistical procedures, critical thinking about research designs and conclusions, and identifying biases in psychological research. Each student evaluates clinical research studies reported in psychological journals? participates in the design of research on a subject of interest? and prepares a brief review of professional literature on a societallyfocused topic in psychology,demonstrating mastery of American Psychological Association format.

PSY 5390. Psychopharmacology for Therapists. 2 Units.

PSY 5390D. Psychopharmacology. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides an orientation to current approaches to drug therapies for a variety of psychological problems. Topics include medications generally in use; criteria for referring patients for psychopharmacological evaluation; issues related to medication: effective cooperation with other professionals; cultural and interpersonal issues; and how and when medications can contribute to effective treatment. Frequently voiced philosophical, ethical, and legal concerns regarding biological factors and drug treatment are discussed, along with the risks and benefits of drug therapies. Required for MFT students; open to others. Prerequisite: PSY 541.

PSY 5400C. Process of Interpersonal Psychotherapy II. 2-3 Unit.

This course assists students in deepening their understanding of the process of interpersonal therapy and in developing skills in forming therapeutic relationships, dealing with resistance, deepening clients' expressions of feeling, responding to transference and counter transference, and handling termination of the therapy relationship. Prerequisite: PSY 501A. This course may be elected to partly fulfill the Clinical Skill Development requirement in the MFT Concentration.

PSY 5400D. Process of Psychotherapy III A Relational & Gestalt Perspective. 3-4.01 Unit.

This is an elective course designed to deepen the student's skills in and understanding of relational and gestalt psychotherapy. The major focus will be in developing skills such as working in the present moment, moving toward the client's affect, following the client's agenda, sitting more comfortably with uncertainty (the therapist's and client's), recognizing and dealing sensitively and effectively with issues as they arise (including shame), exploring the relationship between therapist and client including transference & countertransference issues and understanding how context shapes our perspective and influences how we operate as therapists. In addition, the class is structured to aid students in gaining an increased awareness of and confidence in their own therapeutic style including recognizing their own limitations and how they are affecting the therapeutic work.

PSY 5410. Assessment and Treatment Planning. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides a critical examination of topics in psychopathology and abnormal psychology, including discussion of criteria for mental health and illness, philosophy and use of the DSM IV, and differential diagnosis of cases. Students consider cultural and gender bias and assessment of clients' problems in cultural context, and are introduced to the process of preparing treatment plans. This course is required for the MFT Concentration, and is a prerequisite for entering clinical training.

PSY 5410D. Documentation Basics: How to Write an Effective Treatment Case Note. 1 Unit.

PSY 5410E. Assesment of Psychopathology & Treatment Planning. 3 Units.

PSY 5410F. Assesment of Psychopathology (90). 3 Units.

PSY 5410G. Psychopathology & Treatment Planning(90). 3 Units.

PSY 5420. Psychological Testing. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to methods of psychological assessment in social, cultural and interpersonal contexts. A broad range of tests in use today are surveyed, considering uses, strengths, weaknesses and cultural biases. Students learn to make effective referrals for psychological evaluations, to evaluate assessment reports critically, and to work with clients using test findings. Students may have the opportunity to take and to administer some frequently used tests. There is a testing materials fee for this class. See tuition and fees section for details. It is strongly recommended that students take this course towards the end of their program, preferably after having completed Personality I and Research Methods.

PSY 5430C. Child and Adolescent Development. 3-4 Unit.

This course provides a survey of physical, cognitive, social, emotional and cultural factors in the development of the healthy person from birth thru adolescence. Attention is given to selected contemporary issues in child and adolescent development, to theories of Freud, Erikson, Piaget and others, and to cultural and gender issues in development. Learning includes direct observation of children and adolescents. This is the gateway course for the Child Studies Specialization. Required for all MAP students.

PSY 5430D. Cross-Cultural Infant Observation. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5430H. Cross-Cultural Infant Observation. 2-3 Unit.

In this class, students learn about the sociocultural matrix of infant development through sensitive, structured observation of a primary caretaker-infant pair over time, with ongoing class discussion of observations and of the process of observation. Cultural universals and cultural variability are considered in terms of students' observations of societal/parental expectations, feeding, sleeping arrangements, attachment, separation, interaction, crying, playing, and risk. The physical development of the infant, emotional and cognitive development and the student's own experience is investigated. Generally offered in Spring and Fall Quarters. Required for students in MFT Child Studies Specialization; may also be open to others. Prerequisite: PSY 543C.

PSY 5430W. Creative Interventions with Children: Looking Outside the Box <CS>. 1 Unit.

PSY 5430X. Eco-Psychology: the Environment and Mental Health. 3 Units.

PSY 5430Y. Working With Adolescents: How to Process And Treat Adolescents' Issues. 1 Unit.

PSY 5440K. Contemporary Issues of Aging. 2-3 Unit.

PSY 5440L. The Myths of Aging. 1 Unit.

PSY 5450. Society and the Individual. 3-4 Unit.

This first-quarter course provides an opportunity for students to explore the psychological effects - for self and others - of social dynamics including marginalization and privilege in relation to race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, and physical difference. Students complete a cultural autobiography and consider psychotherapy as a social institution as well as power and powerlessness in society. Awareness work includes attention to group process in the classroom. The intention is to provide a foundation for effective and sensitive clinical and community work with persons different from self. Required for all MAP students in the first quarter of study. Passing this class is a prerequisite for advancing to the second quarter in the program.

PSY 5450A. Community Psychology: Theories and Methods. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to the field of community psychology as preparation for work with communities on issues relevant to the diverse contemporary urban environments of Southern California. Emphasis is placed on the role of extra-individual processes (e.g., social settings, policies, laws) in understanding the social contexts which shape individual behavior. Students learn new paradigms (e.g., principles of ecology, prevention, power, and empowerment) for working with communities to promote a balance between personal, relational and collective wellbeing. Class members engage in reading and critical discussions on the role of values in their work as family therapists in the broader community. Students learn theory and skills that promote engagement of the broader community in assessing problems in the community and addressing them through ameliorative and transformative interventions. This is the gateway course for the ACP specialization. Required for all MFT students. This course is a prerequisite for all courses in the Applied Community Psychology (ACP) Specialization.

PSY 5450AA. Compassion Fatigue: Taking Care While Taking Care. 1 Unit.

PSY 5450C. Psychology in the Community. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to the field of community psychology as preparation for work with communities on issues relevant to the diverse contemporary urban environments of Southern California. Emphasis is placed on the role of extra-individual processes in understanding the social contexts which shape individual behavior. Students learn new paradigms for working with communities to promote a balance between personal, relational and collective wellbeing. Class members engage in reading and critical discussions on the role of values in their work as family therapists in the broader community. Students learn theory and skills that promote engagement of the broader community in assessing problems in the community and addressing them through ameliorative and transformative interventions. Required for all MFT students.

PSY 5450CC. Grantsmanship for Non-Profits. 3 Units.

PSY 5450D. Community Consultation & Collaboration. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to the role of professional psychologists as consultants and collaborators with individuals, groups, organizations, and agencies providing services to a variety of communities and constituencies (social service agencies, nonprofit organizations, mental health service providers, schools, etc.). Topics include the role of consultants and their relationship to the consultee. The course will emphasize consultation skills with attention to all phases of the consultation process: entry, assessment, diagnosis, development, intervention, and termination. The course also focuses on community-based consultation efforts, with particular attention to issues of diversity, community and school settings. Prerequisite: PSY 545C. Required for students in Applied Community Psychology Specialization; open to others.

PSY 5450DD. Empowerment in Community Practice. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5450E. Program Development and Evaluation. 3-4 Unit.

The central goal of the course is to introduce students to basic principles of program development and evaluation as practiced in mental health and community service settings addressing social problems. Emphasis is on practical considerations of what can and cannot be accomplished in real-world community settings with respect to design and implementation of evaluations and the use of evaluation findings in program development. Topics include: performing a needs assessment, developing program goals and program objectives, identifying resources and funding sources, assigning leadership tasks, implementation, evaluation and revision. Prerequisite: PSY 545C. Required for students in Applied Community Psychology Specialization; open to others.

PSY 5450EE. Coalition Bldg in Community Practice. 1 Unit.

PSY 5450F. Prevention and Promotion. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to strategies, models, and methodologies used in the prevention of mental health and psychosocial problems and promotion of competence in individuals, families, and communities. The course emphasizes the importance of problem definition in the development of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies and examines how definition of problems guides the focus of prevention programming. Prevention strategies discussed include consultation, psychoeducational interventions, and empowerment. Attention is given to such issues as community violence, delinquency, adolescent pregnancy, substance abuse, and HIV/AIDS, with special attention given to needs of historically underserved and oppressed populations. Topics include: defining social problems targeted for prevention; origins, rationale, and need for prevention; fundamental concepts and models of prevention; the social context of prevention; prevention strategies and exemplary programs across the lifespan; program evaluation; and empowerment, community mobilization, self efficacy, and social change. Prerequisite: PSY 545C. Required for students in Applied Community Psychology Specialization; open to others.

PSY 5450HH. Creating Radical Change: Understanding Systems Thinking & the Dynamics Involved In Systems Change. 1 Unit.

PSY 5450J. Social Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5450JJ. Social Justice Advocacy Skills. 2 Units.

PSY 5450KK. Liberation Psychology: Intercultural Depth Psychology & Trauma Theory (ACP). 3 Units.

Psychologies of Liberation have developed on every continent in recent decades to address the aftermath of violence, especially forms of physical and psychological abuse that have affected whole populations as in racial oppression, violence against women, homophobia, state terror, and genocide. The wounds of such violence have begun to be theorized as a form of collective trauma within these psychologies which link trauma theory with depth psychologies and community social justice activism. This course will present in historical context some of the analyses, literatures, and films that have emerged from Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Germany, Vietnam, and the United States on these topics. We will explore the symptoms of traumatic experience and the difficulties of memorializing such experiences through official histories and monuments as well as through resistant counter-memories and counter-monuments in environments where majorities erase the past through amnesia about historical events. Various projects of dialogue, reconciliation, and restoration will be analyzed, and community liberation arts projects will be explored. Finally, we will discern the outlines of new practices and theories emerging as liberation psychologies, questioning what aspects of our own understandings may have been shaped by a traumatic past. We will begin the course with an analysis of traumatic experiences in specific environments, drawing on film and literature to focus on symptoms and cultural effects of both physical and psychological violence. In the middle weeks of the course we will sort through the outcomes of violence for victims as well as for perpetrators, bystanders, and witnesses, and we will trace their performances in historic attempts at dialogue, reconciliation, or denial. Finally, in the last several weeks we will explore the theories and methodologies, as well as innovative aesthetics and ethics that have developed as liberation psychologies, evolving in communities to promote collaborative forms of art, dialogue, and research that break with the status quo and develop new solidarities for social transformation.

PSY 5450Q. Seeing the Glass Half Full: Asset-Based Community Development. 2 Units.

PSY 5450W. Community Coalition Bldg. 3 Units.

PSY 5450Z. Mental Health Paradigm in Action: 21st Century Recovery Model <ACP>. 2 Units.

PSY 5460B. Multicultural Counseling Assessment & Interventions. 3 Units.

This course is designed to provide students with advanced counseling skills necessary in working with diverse individuals, groups, and families. Students will learn how to select and apply culturally relevant interventions with persons representing multiple, and intersecting, diverse backgrounds including race, culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, socioeconomic status, age, ability, religion, and spirituality. Culturally relevant models of counseling theory and practice will be explored to enhance student clinical conceptualizations and treatment interventions. Student acquisition of knowledge and skills will be facilitated through course material and experiential activities (in-class practice of skills).

PSY 5460D. The Psychology of Disability and Chronic Illness. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5460H. Psychotherapy As Liberation & Social Transformation: a Diversity Workshop. 1 Unit.

PSY 5470. Human Sexuality. 3-4 Unit.

Human sexual anatomy and response, sex roles, homosexual and heterosexual behavior, female and male sexual dysfunction and contemporary clinical treatment methods for sexual problems are studied in this class. There is consistent focus on students' own beliefs, attitudes and feelings, and examination of sexual mores, ethical issues, and sociocultural issues such as heteronormativity, homophobia and gender bias. Required for MFT Concentration, open to others. This is the gateway course for the LGBT specialization.

PSY 5480. Professional Ethics and the Law. 3-4 Unit.

This class provides an overview of legal and ethical issues associated with practice as a psychotherapist, counselor or psychological researcher, including latest laws, court decisions and regulations. Topics include confidentiality, child abuse reporting, record keeping, patients' rights, scope of practice, duty to warn and special ethical issues in treating children. Required for MFT Concentration. A prerequisite for entering clinical training.

PSY 5500. Chemical Dependency and Psychopharmacology. 3-4 Unit.

This class begins with an overview of physical mechanisms involved in psychopharmacology, as a foundation for understanding drugs used as adjuncts to therapy, as well as alcohol and other chemical dependency phenomena. Further topics include medical aspects and major treatment approaches for alcoholism and other chemical dependencies, including evaluation, theories of etiology, legal aspects, at-risk populations, prevention of substance abuse, and community resources for assessment, treatment, and follow-up for the abuser and family. This course or 550A is required for MFCC Concentration. Students entering before 1/98 may use this course to meet the 550A requirement, but may not take both 550 and 550A.

PSY 5500B. Assessment & Treatment of Addictive Disorders. 3 Units.

This course examines conditions in self and society associated with the use and abuse of addictive substances, particularly alcohol and drugs, and explores a variety of traditional and nontraditional approaches and models for treatment of alcoholism and chemical dependency. Further topics include medical aspects, evaluation, theories of etiology, legal issues, prevention, and follow-up for the abuser and family. Some attention will be given to family issues of substance abuse, and to addictive issues related to work, gambling, eating and sexuality. Required for the MFT Concentration.

PSY 5500C. Chemical Dependency. 3-4 Unit.

This course examines conditions in self and society associated with the use and abuse of addictive substances, particularly alcohol and drugs, and explores a variety of traditional and nontraditional approaches and models for treatment of alcoholism and chemical dependency. Further topics include medical aspects, evaluation, theories of etiology, legal issues, prevention, and follow-up for the abuser and family. Some attention will be given to family issues of substance abuse, and to addictive issues related to work, gambling, eating and sexuality. Required for the MFT Concentration.

PSY 5500E. Integrative Treatment of Addictive & Co-Ocurring Disorders. 3 Units.

PSY 5500F. Prevention & Treatment of Relapse From Addictive Disorders. 1 Unit.

This workshop will examine the bio-psycho-social aspects of the relapse (a return to chronic use after a period of abstinence or significantly reduced use) process. The student will be introduced to the concept of withdrawal, post acute withdrawal and craving from both a biological, psychological and systemic perspective. Students will learn to assess the client's specific diagnostic, and social vulnerabilities to relapse as presented at various stages of recovery and to create an appropriate prevention strategy. Students will also learn how to treat clients who currently are experiencing relapse in order to strength their recovery. Students will be exposed to various evidenced based modalities of treatment and prevention of relapse including: medical interventions, psycho educational and cognitive behavioral approaches, as well as systems and experiential techniques (mindfulness).

PSY 5500G. Family Systems Treatment of Addictive Disorders. 2-3 Unit.

This course will include an in-depth, study of family dynamics as related to addictive disorders and co-dependency. Various modalities of family therapy will be presented (family disease model, family systems model, cognitive-behavioral approach family therapy model, and multidimensional family therapy, etc). Students will learn, through lecture/discussion and in class exercises to implement a systemic conceptualization, assessment and treatment plan. They will also be afforded an opportunity to practice their learning through in class role plays.

PSY 5510A. Group Treatment Methods I. 3-4 Unit.

This course includes theory and experiential work on group psychotherapy, with particular emphasis on skills for leading different kinds of therapy groups. Participation in a classroom therapy group as member and/or leader is included, with study of group formation, norms, leadership, boundary issues, and groups for different populations. Prerequisite: PSY 501 Required for MFT Concentration.

PSY 5510B. Group Treatment Methods. 2-3 Unit.

The major goal of this course is to explore in depth the essential issues of group treatment and facilitation. Students will strengthen core clinical skills through participation in class discussions, through observation, participation and/or leadership of the demonstration group and through group supervision. There will be a particular focus on students' individual and interpersonal dynamics in response to the course material and process. Students will additionally explore issues related to forming a therapeutic alliance, working with client resistance, deepening client expressions of feeling, understanding transference and countertransference and handling termination of the therapeutic relationship.

PSY 5530D. Crisis Intervention Workshop Theory and Therapy. 1 Unit.

PSY 5550D. Introduction to Relational Gestalt Theory and Therapy. 1 Unit.

PSY 5580. Jungian Psychology (SDP). 2 Units.

This course presents the theory and practice of Jungian Psychology and explores the application of basic Jungian concepts in clinical practice. Particular emphasis is placed on the encounter with the unconscious with a focus on the students' own experience as well as on mediation of unconscious processes within the therapeutic relationship. Prerequisite: PSY 531A.

PSY 5580D. Taking the Red Pill: Theory and Practice of Jungian Psychology. 1 Unit.

PSY 5580Q. Introduction to Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention. 1 Unit.

Addictions - whether to alcohol, drugs, food, gambling, or other behaviors - often stem from a desire to escape our current experience. By bringing awareness to this tendency, and by finding new ways to relate to our experiences, whether pleasant or unpleasant, we can step out of our habitual tendencies, and choose a more skillful response. This workshop serves as a basic introduction to Mindfulness-Based Relapse Prevention (MBRP), an aftercare program intended for individuals who have completed initial treatment for substance use disorders. MBRP integrates mindfulness practices with cognitive-behavioral strategies to help clients relate more compassionately and skillfully to physical, mental, or emotional experiences. The workshop will consist of an experiential tour of the core practices and exercises from the eight-week MBRP program. In addition to lecture by the instructor, students will take part in various meditation practices and cognitive-behavioral exercises so they can experience MBRP for themselves.

PSY 5600E. Somatic Psychology: Waking Up the Emotional Body. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5610A. Contemporary Perspectives on Transpersonal Psychology: Integrating Principles of Eastern Yogic Spirituality With Clinical Practice. 1 Unit.

PSY 5610B. Contemporary Perspectives on Transpersonal Psychology: Integrating Principles of Eastern Yogic Spirituality With Clinical Practice Part II <sdp>. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5640E. Introducing Narrative Therapy in Clinical Practice. 1 Unit.

PSY 5640F. Queer Counseling and Narrative Practice. 2 Units.

PSY 5640H. Narrative Therapy in Practice. 3-4 Unit.

Students will learn the underlying assumptions, the working principles, and the basic practices of engaging resource-oriented narrative therapy. This will be a highly interactive class with weekly discussion of readings, collaborative dyadic/group role-play and exercises, viewing of film and videod clinical work, and in-class instructor clinical interviews with students. Included in our studies will be narrative approaches to working with adults, children, couples, trauma, and addiction.

PSY 5650. Existential Theory and Therapy. 3 Units.

This class provides an introduction to the theory and practice of existential psychotherapy. Issues of responsibility, death, isolation, freedom and meaninglessness are addressed, and strategies for psychotherapy with adults and couples are presented.

PSY 5660. Couples Counseling. 3-4 Unit.

This course presents a variety of perspectives on the theory and practice of psychotherapeutic work with married and unmarried couples, including family systems and other approaches and with attention to issues of sexual orientation, ethnicity and culture. Required for MFT Concentration. Prerequisite: PSY 535.

PSY 5660B. Couples Counseling. 2-3 Unit.

This course presents a variety of perspectives on the theory and practice of psychotherapeutic work with married and unmarried couples, including family systems and other approaches, and with attention to issues of sexual orientation, ethnicity and culture.

PSY 5670A. Treatment of Children and Adolescents. 3-4 Unit.

This class surveys theory and practice of therapeutic work with children and adolescents, including diagnosis, treatment planning, work with young people of different ages and back-grounds, legal/ethical considerations, and treatment for a wide range of particular problems such as learning disabilities and adolescent substance abuse. This course is required for MFT Concentration. Prerequisite: PSY 543C.

PSY 5670R. Early Attachment Between Parent & Child: How the secure Enough Self Is Formed In Intersubjective Relationship (or Not). 1 Unit.

PSY 5670T. Treatment of Children & Adolescents. 2 Units.

Course provides students with the foundations of the developmental and attachment theories and clinical practice when working with children and adolescents. Students will learn clinical interventions related to the beginning, middle and end stages of treatment, including art therapy techniques when working with families, individuals, adolescents and children in multiple settings. Students are expected to build upon previous knowledge of children's developmental stages so that they familiarize themselves with representations of normative development. Attachment theory related to the treatment of children is presented through lecture, class experiential and role-playing. Treatment guidelines and clinical interventions for specialized treatment issues such as trauma, abuse, severe mental health disorders and disabilities that integrate the art into clinical treatment are highlighted.

PSY 5680A. Child Advocacy and Social Policy. 3-4 Unit.

This course explores fundamental tenets of child advocacy and social policy. As a professional discipline, child advocacy fosters children's access to resources, power and education within society. Scholarly studies are examined on a broad range of societal issues related to the healthy development and education of children in society. Topics may include ethnic violence, drugs, poverty, the juvenile justice system, health and mental health care, and child abuse. The class is designed to assist students in building an ongoing professional commitment to advocating for the welfare and rights of children in society. Offered in Fall Quarter only. Required for students in Child Studies Specialization; may also be open to others. Prerequisite: PSY 543C.

PSY 5680MA. Community Interventions With Lgbt Youth. 1 Unit.

PSY 5680U. LGBTQ Youth Development: Conceptualization & Intervention Skills. 1 Unit.

PSY 5710. Traumatic Grief and Loss. 3-4 Unit.

Childhood, adolescence, adulthood and aging, as distinct life stages, require different knowledge and skills to assess and treat varied traumatic grief reactions. The framework for this course involves theories of grief and loss, assessment, and intervention with children, adolescents and adults. The interplay between normal grief and bereavement, and clinical syndromes is analyzed for the purpose of developing empirically based interventions grounded in psychology values and an ethical decision making process. The effects of trauma, grief, loss, and life threatening illness on individuals, both negative effects as well as aspects of human resilience will be examined. Students will develop an advanced understanding of the grief process experienced by people from diverse backgrounds, affirming and respecting their strengths and differences. This course is designed to help students engage clients in appropriate working relationships, and to identify needs, resources and assets for coping with traumatic grief reactions.

PSY 5711. Disasters, Mass Violence and Psychologic al First Aid. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the psychological and physiological human response to disasters, mass violence and the practice of psychological first aid. Using clinical research and case histories, students will examine normal and abnormal psychological reactions, the recovery process and principles of mental health care for victims of and professional responders to mass disasters and mass violence. Differences between natural and man-made disasters are examined and factors that mitigate post-traumatic effects are reviewed. Issues of assessment, diagnosis and treatment of acute stress disorders and other trauma spectrum disorders will be thoroughly addressed.

PSY 5712. Sexual Trauma and Human Trafficking. 2-3 Unit.

This course has been designed to explore the nature of sexual traumas. A foundation and exploration of the sociological and psychological underpinnings and perspective of sexual crimes is provided to further understanding of the physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual trauma experienced by victims of sexual crimes and human trafficking. A grounded and well-informed understanding of methods involved in recruiting potential victims, the interplays of control, specific terminology in the field, and narrowing the focus to discussing the different strategies of human trafficking will be presented.

PSY 5713. Trauma Ax/Tx Across the Developmental Spectrum. 3-4 Unit.

This course will introduce students to the core concepts (general theory and foundational knowledge), which informs empirically supported assessment and intervention with traumatized children, adolescents and adults. Trauma is broadly defined, and includes exposure to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence) and other traumatic events across the developmental spectrum. This course will examine the effects of trauma on emotional, cognitive, neurological and physical human systems. It will address the level of functioning of primary care giving environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

PSY 5714. Exploration of Post Traumatic Growth. 1 Unit.

Recently the field of trauma psychology has directed research and attention beyond recovering from PTSD and traumatic experiences to the possibility of post-traumatic growth. Researchers have investigated not only what makes people resilient but what characteristics and conditions enable people to come through healing and end up wiser, stronger, more fulfilled, and with a deeper meaning to their lives than they had before trauma event. This course provides an overview of the theory and research of individuals' positive reactions to trauma--often called trauma transformation, self-reinvention, positive life change, posttraumatic growth (PTG), stress-related growth (SRG) or self-transcendence.

PSY 5720G. Spousal Abuse and Domestic Violence. 2-3 Unit.

Essential issues of domestic violence are considered in this course, including dynamics related to spousal, child and elder abuse, family issues and multigenerational patterns. Students' knowledge and confidence are strengthened through examination of the cycle of domestic violence. Also included are applications for gay and lesbian couples, and review of students' personal attitudes and experiences, as a contribution to future clinical competence. Required for all MFT students; offered all day on two Fridays or two Sundays.

PSY 5720H. Treating Internalized Homophobia in Relationships: LGBT Approaches to Domestic Violence. 2 Units.

PSY 5720J. Exposure to Community Violence: Effects On Children and Adolescents. 1 Unit.

PSY 5720M. Trauma & Its Aftermath: Evidence Based Treatment of Traumatized Children and Adolescents. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5720P. Domestic Violence: Child, Intimate Partner, and Elder. 3 Units.

This hybrid course has been designed to foster a grounded and well-informed understanding of the individual and inter-generational effects of domestic violence in children, intimate relationships, and the elderly and to equip mental health professionals to recognize, assess, and effectively intervene in these cases. The course will begin by presenting a global perspective on violence and oppression and interventions being utilized around the world. It will then narrow the focus to issues specific to intimate partner, elder, and child abuse within the United States. There will be 2 full day class meetings along with four online learning modules, which consist of reading, viewing, researching, and responding. The course will conclude with a final paper of approximately 9-12 pages.

PSY 5730K. Melanie Klein: Object Relations for Relational Therapies. 2-3 Unit.

PSY 5730S. Introduction to Attachment Theory. 1 Unit.

Early attachments have a profound effect on the nature and quality of relationships throughout life. Secure attachments in infancy foster healthy relationships in adulthood, while insecure attachments, trauma and loss hinder the development of healthy relationships and may lead to emotional disorders. This workshop focuses on the development of early attachments and their effect on subsequent relationships, as well as clinical implications for effective treatment.

PSY 5730W. Making Melanie Klein Relevant: Accessing And Transforming Infantile States. 1 Unit.

PSY 5750E. Psychoeducational Groups and In-Service Training Development. 3-4 Unit.

This course introduces students to fundamental elements of designing and implementing psychoeducational programs for the general public and allied professionals (educators, social service agency personnel, etc.). The course emphasizes a hands-on approach, as each student develops a psychoeducational program or in-service training on a topic of his or her choice. Topics include: the fundamentals of group training, audience assessment, how to develop topics, how to generate effective handouts and audio-visual aids, presentation skills, and evaluation and assessment. Prerequisite: PSY 545C. Required for students in Applied Community Psychology Specialization; may be open to others.

PSY 5750H. Large Group Facilitation: Process Design & Skills for Exploration, Conflict Transformation, Decision-Making & Collaborative Action (ACP). 3 Units.

This course is designed to develop participants' capacities as skillful facilitators and to enable them to design and conduct effective group processes for exploration, conflict transformation, decision-making and collaborative action. The course is structured around three all-day class sessions that are complemented by observation of real meetings and mentored, applied practice as facilitators in the community. We will learn methods appropriate for guiding community and organizational meetings, conducting public processes, and for enabling difficult dialogues across conflict divides. Participants will learn how to assess the needs of a group and to design processes to address them. This will include processes to help groups improve understanding, strengthen relationships, engage in collaborative problem solving, engage in effective decision-making, and mobilization for community change. Participants will become familiar with a variety of methods and techniques to achieve process goals with groups ranging in size from three to 3,000. Through a variety of readings, exercises and reflections, the course will assist participants' formation as reflective practitioners facilitating group processes. We will focus on developing awareness of group dynamics, while cultivating openness and offering a calm presence even in the midst of high levels of anxiety and conflict. We will consider a variety of facilitator roles and functions and critically assess the ethics and appropriateness of these roles and functions for different types of situations. The approach presented in this course emphasizes the Engagement Streams Framework developed by the National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation and a North American peacebuilding paradigm, we will aim to also explore facilitation in other cultural traditions and raise awareness of the challenges of facilitating cross-culturally and in multicultural contexts.

PSY 5770G. Jungian Dream Work. 1 Unit.

Carl Jung believed that dreams were meaningful expressions of the unconscious psyche-the source of creativity, memory, desires, and collective myth. This workshop provides students with an opportunity to explore the therapeutic value of Jungian dream work techniques. The intention is to support students in their creative process, psychological awareness, and personal growth. Each student is encouraged to gain an increased appreciation of creative uses of dream work for personal and clinical practice.

PSY 5770H. Working With Dreams on Multiple Levels. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach students how to work with dreams from an individual process standpoint, a family relational and process perspective, and a community and ecological perspective. This workshop is two fold: process and technique. The process piece will focus on: 1) How to understand and work with the relational/intersubjective dimension of dreams. 2) How to establish the therapeutic dream framework with children, families, and community. 3) How to work with affect expressed in dreams. 4) How to work with transference and counter-transference issues and dreams. 5) How to decide your approach to dream work, what language to use, and how to really contact/integrate the Unconscious. The technique piece will focus on how to work with clients experiencing issues with trauma and nightmares, family conflict and dysfunction, and community level distress. The workshop will address three techniques for dream decoding; and three types of dream work from individual, family, and group perspectives. Overall this workshop should load your tool bag with new ways and techniques to work with dreams, a dimension of clinical practice so often overlooked. The Workshop will make use of readings, lecture, video presentations, role play , and class discussion. Prerequisites: Psy 543C Child and Adolescent Development.

PSY 5810J. Inner Theater: Working With Active Imagination (SDP). 1 Unit.

PSY 5810Q. Introduction to Art Therapy: Attachment And the Brain. 1 Unit.

PSY 5860. Eating Disorders: Theoretical and Clinical Implications. 2-3 Unit.

This course is designed for the student who wants to understand and implement a psychodynamic approach in the treatment of eating disorders. Etiology and treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and compulsive overeating are explored from the perspectives of object relations theory, self psychology, and attachment theory. Essential medical, family and social characteristics of eating disorders are considered.

PSY 5860C. Dynamics and Treatment of Eating Disorders. 1 Unit.

PSY 5860F. Narrative Therapy & Eating Disorders: Developing Skills for Remaining Collaborative While Working With Dangerous Problems. 1 Unit.

PSY 5890S. Trauma in Childhood & Adolescence. 1 Unit.

PSY 5910. Grief and Loss. 1 Unit.

The goal of this workshop is to introduce students to the study of grief and loss. Topics include current theories of normal and complicated grief; factors influencing grief reactions; funerals; bereavement following the death of a child; the death of a parent; death by violence; support groups and therapeutic intervention.

PSY 5910A. Grief and Bereavement for Adults and Children. 2-3 Unit.

PSY 5910B. Death and Dying: Transforming The Dying Process. 1 Unit.

PSY 5910E. Redfining Grief& Loss: a Narrative Approach. 2 Units.

This 2-unit class will introduce students to narrative practices that can be helpful when working with people who are dying and/or people who are living with grief. Using a theoretical model based in social constructionism and narrative therapy, we will explore the thinking and practice of re-membering conversations. Attention will be given to understand differences between the theoretical constructs in modern ways of thinking about death and bereavement with that of a postmodern approach. Students will be given opportunity to experience practical implications of these varying clinical approaches.

PSY 5920. Working With Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse. 2-3 Unit.

This workshop reviews research on the prevalence and incidence of childhood sexual abuse, presents both object relations and cognitive restructuring models of psychotherapy with survivors, and addresses issues of transference, counter-transference, compliance with reporting laws, and post-traumatic stress disorder treatment for adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse.

PSY 5930AA. Clinical and Community Issues <LGBT>. 3 Units.

PSY 5930BB. Affirmative Addictions, Treatment Sensitization, and Skills Workshop. 2 Units.

PSY 5930DD. Multicultural Mental Health. 3 Units.

PSY 5930DDC. Multicultural Mental Health. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to provide working practitioners with culturally competent affirmative methodology to work clinically with LGBT people of color and other people struggling with oppressions related to identity, difference and disadvantage. This will be accomplished through weekly reading, online instructor/peer comments and feedback, case vignettes, and through personal self-reflection including observing transference/countertransference material throughout the quarter.

PSY 5930GG. Counseling Bisexuals: Providing Bi- Affirmative Therapy in an Era of Sexual, Gender and Cultural Fluidity. 1 Unit.

PSY 5930GH. Bisexual Affirmative Psychotherapy Affirmative Therapy in an Era of Sexual, Gender and Cultural Fluidity. 1 Unit.

This one-day workshop will explore the social and political context in which today's counselors will provide affirmative therapy to bisexuals and others who identify as sexually fluid. Theories of bisexual identity development, myths about bisexuality, patterns of bisexuality, and post-modern concepts of sexual fluidity will be discussed. In addition, bisexual mental health issues will be examined in the context of their intersections with gender fluidity and cultural diversity. Workshop participants will explore ways of providing bi-affirmative therapy that is trans-affirmative and culturally competent. This workshop will incorporate both didactic instruction and experiential learning opportunities.

PSY 5930JJ. Transgender & Gender Diverse Clients: an Affirmative Approach. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5930K. LGBT History and Mythology. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5930KCT. Lgbt History and Mythology. 3 Units.

This class is based on the idea that for LGBT*clients to develop self-esteem, personal*empowerment, self-efficacy, and social*consciousness, they will be best served by*clinicians who can share with them their LGBT*history. This class explores the clinical*importance of understanding and being able to*impart to LGBT clients a reclaiming of LGBT*history, rooted in essentialist ideals that LGBT*people have an inborn, archetypal, erotic,*romantic, relational, psychological, even soulful*connection to LGBT ways of being in the world.*This course posits a clinically relevant*hypothesis that same-sex eros, gender variance,*and transgender identities, have always existed*and must be studied through a lineage of*interconnectedness and consciousness building.

PSY 5930NN. Treating Families Through the LGBT Affirmative Lens. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5930NNC. Treating Families Through the Lgbt-Affirmative Lens. 3 Units.

In accordance with the focus on Relationships and Families contained within APA Guidelines for the Treatment of LGBT Clients (see APA, 2000), practitioners taking this certificate class will be invited to explore the various ways in which clients create LGBT couples and families within existing heterosexist societal conditions so as to discover and utilize the clinical interventions needed to create the most affirmative psychological conditions possible.

PSY 5930PP. LGBT Soul Psychology: the Alchemy of Same-Sex Love, Bi-Love and Gender Variance. 1 Unit.

PSY 5930QQ. Therapeutic Process With Transgender Clients (LGBT). 2 Units.

PSY 5930RR. Advanced Multi-Theory Approach to LGBTQIA Clinical Work (LGBT). 2-3 Unit.

This course will study and apply literature from a wide variety of theoretical orientations (psychoanalytic, self psychology, CBT, humanistic, existential, sex therapy, and narrative) to clinical work with LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, Ally) clients/patients. An integration of theory is important to the effective treatment of LGBTQIA clients/patients. The historical context of ideas will be discussed, especially in relationship to the LGBTQIA-Affirmative movement. Intersections of socio-cultural factors that influence minority mental health will have a strong emphasis. Clinical concepts to be discussed in context of working with LGBTQIA clients include (but are not limited to): unconditional positive regard, the unconscious, true/false self, self-object transferences, negative cognitions & schemas, intersections of identity, multiculturalism, empowerment, egalitarianism, homeostasis, and externalization) as they relate to LGBTQIA psychological healing. This course meets the additional process class, representing an alternative theoretical orientation (2 units) requirement for students. This course meets the LGBT Specialization elective unit requirement.

PSY 5930SS. Working with LGBTQIA Clients: Theoretic Applications. 2-3 Unit.

This course will study and apply literature from a wide variety of theoretical orientations (psychoanalytic, self psychology, CBT, humanistic, existential, sex therapy, and narrative) to clinical work with LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, Asexual, Ally) clients/patients. An integration of theory is important to the effective treatment of LGBTQIA clients/patients. The historical context of ideas will be discussed, especially in relationship to the LGBTQIA-Affirmative movement. Intersections of socio-cultural factors that influence minority mental health will have a strong emphasis. Clinical concepts to be discussed in context of working with LGBTQIA clients include (but are not limited to): unconditional positive regard, the unconscious, true/false self, self-object transferences, negative cognitions & schemas, intersections of identity, multiculturalism, empowerment, egalitarianism, homeostasis, and externalization) as they relate to LGBTQIA psychological healing. This course meets the additional process class, representing an alternative theoretical orientation (2 units) requirement for students. This course meets the LGBT Specialization elective unit requirement.

PSY 5930V. Feminism - Not for Women Only: Theory and Clinical Practice <LGBT>. 1 Unit.

PSY 5930X. Contemporary Mental Health With Queer Women. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5930Y. Lgbt Addiction Recovery: an Affirmative Approach to Healing and Transformation. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5930Z. Affirmative Psychotherapy. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5930ZCT. Affirmative Psychotherapy. 3 Units.

The goal of this class is designed to provide working professionals with an introduction to the principles of the school of Affirmative psychotherapy that emerged in the 1970s LGBT liberation movement. This class also attempts to develop a practical and general form to address these historic guidelines in the therapist's clinical practice through education and sensitization. Through reading, online exercises, discussions and creative use of the hybrid class environment, we will attempt to engage the clinician's expertise in different modalities (e.g., humanistic; psychodynamic; CBT; postmodern; and existential) to achieve a preliminary and respectfully eclectic working model of how to do Affirmative therapy.

PSY 5931. Intersex Clients: Biomedical, Ethical And Psychological Considerations. 1-2 Unit.

Recently the field of trauma psychology has directed research and attention beyond recovering from PTSD and traumatic experiences to the possibility of post-traumatic growth. Researchers have investigated not only what makes people resilient but what characteristics and conditions enable people to come through healing and end up wiser, stronger, more fulfilled, and with a deeper meaning to their lives than they had before trauma event. This course provides an overview of the theory and research of individuals' positive reactions to trauma--often called trauma transformation, self-reinvention, positive life change, posttraumatic growth (PTG), stress-related growth (SRG) or self-transcendence.

PSY 5940D. Life and Teaching of the Historical Buddha. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5940G. Art of Relationship in Tibetan Buddhism. 4 Units.

PSY 5940M. Frontiers in Integrative Depth Psychology. 3-4 Unit.

PSY 5940N. David Epston: Master Class in Narrative Therapy. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5940P. The Shadow Side of Spirituality: a Clinical Consideration of the Traumatizing Legacy of Organized Religion. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940Q. Spritual & Depth Psychology Research Seminar. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940R. Depth Psychological Inquiry: Research And Soul. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940S. The Embodied Spirit: Integratigration of Mind, Body, Brain and Spirit & the Emergence of Authenticity. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940T. The Myth of Osiris & African American Male Identity Development. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940U. The Embodied Spirit, Part 2: Integration Of Mind, Body, Brain and Spirit and the Emergence of Authenticity. 1-2 Unit.

PSY 5940V. The Psychological Teachings of the Historical Buddha. 4 Units.

PSY 5940W. Introduction to Jungian Sandplay Therapy. 1 Unit.

PSY 5940X. Depth in Nature: Trauma, Somatic, Mindfulness, & Equine Assisted Psychotherapy (SDP). 1 Unit.

PSY 5960. Independent Learning. 1-5 Unit.

PSY 596 A/B is the course designation for independent study directed and evaluated by a faculty member or approved evaluator. The learning activity may be designed to incorporate workshops, seminars or undergraduate classes with appropriate additional graduate-level reading and writing. The first independent learning activity in a student's program is designated 596A, with subsequent activities as 596B, C and so on.(To register for PSY 596, the student must submit Form A, Permission to register for Independent Learning Activity, with signature of the appropriate faculty member.).

PSY 5970A. Assessment & Treatment of Clients With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder & Co-Occurring Substance/Alcohol Abuse, Dependency, Or Addiction. 3 Units.

PSY 5970B. Assesment & Treatment of Military Personnel/First Responders With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd) & Co-Occurring Substance/Alcohol Abuse, Dependency, Or Addiction. 3 Units.

PSY 5970C. Assessment & Treatment of Trauma Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the Civilian Population--Ptsd III. 2 Units.

PSY 5970CT. Advanced Clinical Assessment And Treatment of the Spectrum of Traumatic Stress Injury Beyond Ptsd. 3 Units.

This advanced course emphasizes the cutting-edge in our understanding, assessment, and treatment of the spectrum of traumatic stress injuries, beyond PTSD, including but not limited to co-occurring substance use disorders, post-traumatic anger, guilt, traumatic grief, moral injury, medically unexplained physical symptoms, phantom limb pain, depression and suicide, dissociative disorders, misconduct stress behaviors, malingering, sleep disorder, transgenerational trauma, and traumatic brain injury. The course also surveys prevention-related interventions used to promote resilience and post-traumatic growth, along with care-giver screening and treatment for compassion stress injury.

PSY 5970D. Ax/Tx of Military and First Responders Postraumatic Stess Disorder (PTSD) in The Military/First Responder Population --PTSD IV. 2 Units.

PSY 5970E. Domestic Violence & Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the Civilian Population. 1 Unit.

PSY 5970F. Domestic Violence & Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Military Personnel, & Military Couples/Families. 1 Unit.

PSY 5970G. Working With Refugee Populations: Cultural Perspective Series. 2 Units.

PSY 5970H. Trauma & Addictive Behaviors (CRT). 3 Units.

PSY 5980C. Psychology of Personal Control. 1 Unit.

PSY 5989. MPIC Degree Planning Workshop. 0 Units.

MPIC Degree Planning Workshop.

PSY 5990. Master's Document. 1-6 Unit.

PSY 599 is the course designation for approved independent work on the Master's Thesis or Master's Project under the direction of a faculty member. Students may elect 4-12 units over one or several quarters of study, but may register for no more than 6 units in a single quarter. Required for students in MPIC; may be elected by others. (To register for PSY 599, Form K with appropriate signatures is required.).

PSY 6200. Applied Psychotherapeutic Techniques. 1-6 Unit.

PSY 620 A/B is the course designation for clinical training practicum in marriage and family therapy providing experience in psychotherapeutic counseling of individuals, couples and/or families under professional supervision. The training takes place in an approved clinical training site and generally includes participation in staff meetings and training activities. The student's first training site is designated 620A with subsequent traineeships in different settings as 620B, C and so on. Prerequisites: PSY 501A, PSY 541, and PSY 548, as well as attendance at the Clinical Training Orientation and PERFECT meetings.(To register for PSY 620, the student must submit Form D, Permission to register for MFT Traineeship and the Clinical Training Agreement.) 9 units are required for MFT Concentration students; a maximum of 18 units may be elected with no more than 6 units in a single quarter.

PSY 6210. Clinical Practicum. 0 Units.

PSY 6230. Personal Psychotherapy. 0 Units.

PSY 623 A/B is the course designation for students registering to fulfill the MFT Concentration psychotherapy requirement. Students gain experience as a client in individual, conjoint, family or group psychotherapy provided by a licensed therapist throughout the 12-week quarter, at a minimum of one hour per week. If a student begins work with a second therapist or changes to a different form of therapy with the same therapist, the new learning activity is designated PSY 623B.(To register for PSY 623, the student must submit Form C, Permission to register for Personal Psychotherapy.) Students in MFT Concentration are required to register for two or more quarters of PSY 623.

PSY 6240TCR. Trauma-Focused Clinical Case Consultation. 3 Units.

This required course is an online component of the trauma certificate program that utilize learners' actual clinical experiences in their existing practices by allowing them to apply trauma-focused theory learned in the program into their current clinical work. There is increased documentation (e.g., Brown, 2008) of an articulated need for the inclusion of courses that provide participants with an opportunity to discuss clinical material and receive feedback from colleagues, as well as trauma experts, facilitating the class. Such a course is aligned with the mission of the department and goals of the trauma certificate program to develop competent clinicians who are particularly skilled in working with traumas. This course also serves as a way for participants to apply theories and integrate the constructs learned, with practical clinical skills, which will help to formulate a final case presentation that may serve as a capstone of their learning.

PSY X2000. Psychology / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X2001. Psychology & Bus / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X2003. Psychology & Child Stu / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X2004. Psych & Psych / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X2005. Psych & UCE / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X4000. Psychology / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X4001. Psychology & Bus / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X4003. Psychology & Child Stu / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X4004. Psych & Psych / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X4005. Psych & UCE / Social Science Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

PSY X5000. MA Psychology Elective. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

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