Teacher Education

Courses

TEP 5000B. Grassroots Organizing for Social Justice. 3 Units.

Most progressive social change in the U.S. has been achieved through social movements (the civil rights movement, the anti-war movement, the labor movement, the women's movement, etc.). While strategies such as legal advocacy, social service provision, direct action mobilizing, and participation in electoral politics have all played a role in advancing progressive goals, movements anchored in grassroots organizing have been the engines driving progress toward greater equality, freedom, and democracy within the U.S. These sessions will introduce candidates to a specific social change strategy-direct action labor/community organizing. Organizing is the process by which ordinary people gain the power needed to bring about change in oppressive policies or institutions.

TEP 5040.LA. Social Science and Children's Experience. 3 Units.

This course teaches methods of making social science content knowledge meaningful in children's lives. Approaches include developmentally-appropriate instruction in the processes of government, politics, and history-making, including the sociocultural and political factors affecting first and second-language development, and the implications of the differential status of language and dialects, value systems, and skin color. Candidates learn how to engage students in the study of different cultures in the US and California, including contributions of cultural diversity, and relationships of superordination and subordination relative to culture.

TEP 5050.LA. Reading Instruction in Elementary Classrooms. 3 Units.

In this course, candidates learn to provide balanced and comprehensive reading instruction for K-8 classrooms, with an emphasis on emergent reading. Relationships between oral and written discourse and language variation are studied in order for candidates to begin to develop flexible literacy instruction strategies and skills to meet the needs of diverse students. Candidates examine social, cultural, economic, and political factors affecting literacy development particularly first- and second-language development.

TEP 5070.LA. Real World Mathematics. 3 Units.

This course reflects an interdisciplinary, culturally responsive approach to teaching mathematics that enables teachers to engage all students with the core curriculum in a real-world context. Candidates learn to use a variety of pedagogic methods and teaching materials as well as a variety of opportunities for their students to demonstrate their knowledge. Candidates engage in reflective dialog regarding the NCTM Standards, the California State Framework, and the content standards for mathematics. Strategies for teaching mathematics to second-language learners are practiced.

TEP 5100.LA. Science: Discovery Teaching, Action Learning. 3 Units.

This course introduces methods of teaching science within the context of ecology with a focus on fostering English language development (including SDAIE and ELD) particularly the development of students' science-related language. Critical thinking, problem-solving, and problem-posing are at the center of unit and lesson planning. Candidates plan and implement balanced instruction with knowledge of how physical, life, and earth science content standards are achieved in conjunction with investigation and experimentation. Candidates design instruction informed by students' development and language usage. Candidates learn to use literature, to teach students how science was and is learned--through hands-on experiment and discovery. Teaching students to protect and sustain ecological systems is considered central to the course.

TEP 5110.LA. Language Arts Curricula: Theory and Methods. 3 Units.

Candidates expand their foundational learning from TEP 505 by deepening and broadening their abilities to plan and deliver a comprehensive, integrated, interdisciplinary, and methodologically-grounded language arts program that supports access to the core language arts curriculum for all students. Theories and methods of instruction for English language development (ELD) and specially designed academic instruction delivered in English (SDAIE) are reviewed. Candidate competency is expanded to include more integrated instructional approaches to promoting fluency through reading, writing, spelling, oral language, vocabulary development and the use of various genres of literature and expository texts that reflect cultural diversity for all elementary grades.

TEP 5120A. Student Teaching With Professional Seminar. 12 Units.

Candidates begin on-site daily student teaching under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. They take on increasing responsibilities for the class throughout the quarter. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week's teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the degree. Culturally-responsive instruction and teaching with mutual respect and care are reviewed and discussed in the context of candidates' standards-based teaching experiences. Candidates learn legal and professional requirements and expectations. Candidates' questions are explored with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TEP 5130.LA. The Arts in Culture and Learning. 3 Units.

This course is designed to enable candidates to understand the role of art, artists, and culture in teaching children in a multicultural society. Candidates are introduced to interpretive models for understanding the role of art in building culture, particularly major cultural groups represented in California. Candidates learn how to integrate artistic methods into all disciplines by providing culturally-responsive instruction based on the Visual and Performing Arts Framework adapted to the needs of diverse students. Candidates will engage in direct art making activities, reflective writing and discussion, and attend an Evening for Educators Program at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in order to better understand these strategies and processes and use them effectively in an elementary and middle school classroom. Music and its role in the classroom will also be addressed. The instructors of this course and TEP 510 Science: Discovery Teaching, Action Learning will coordinate several of the assignments culminating in an integrated thematic unit.

TEP 5150A. Student Teaching with Professional Seminar II. 12 Units.

Candidates continue to engage in on-site daily novice teaching under the supervision of a Cooperating Teacher and University Supervisor. The required weekly seminar continues to integrate each week's teaching experience with theory and methods studied in the Program. Candidates take over all class responsibilities for at least a two-week period. They plan how they will start the year in their own classroom and discuss employment options. Candidates complete the Program Portfolio. Culturally-responsive instruction and teaching with mutual respect and care are reviewed and discussed in the context of candidates' teaching experiences. Candidates learn legal and professional requirements and expectations. Candidates' questions are explored with peers and instructor in a supportive, problem-solving context.

TEP 5190. Educational Technology. 2 Units.

In this course, candidates gain experience in web-based research strategies for instructional materials as well as for classroom use. The instructor facilitates candidates' developing a personal philosophy of educational technology and independent expertise. Educational software and websites usable with a diverse student population are reviewed and critiqued. Candidates critically examine cultural and socioeconomic differences relative to use of and access to technology. Various uses of information technology and the experiential nature of teaching with educational technology are explored. Candidates develop the knowledge and skills to integrate technology into the classroom and motivate diverse students with different abilities, learning styles, and accessibility issues.

TEP 5250. Physical Education and Movement. 1 Unit.

In this course candidates learn fitness activities, developmentally appropriate movement activities as defined in the National Physical Education Standards and the California Framework on Physical Education and develop knowledge of locomotor and non-locomotor skills. Definitions and examples of health related physical fitness are introduced and discussed. Candidates learn activities that will establish classroom management, cooperative and team building activities, and provide success for all students during physical education activities. Candidates will be introduced to assessment methods in physical education. Modifications of activities will be examined and practiced for English Learners and students with physical disabilities.

TEP 5260. Systems Thinking. 3 Units.

This course presents principles of general systems theory and key aspects of their application in psychology, organizational and urban development and education. The course is built as a means of evoking and developing systemic dispositions in students' personal and professional experiences. Candidates will evolve with basic knowledge and skills essential to effectively identify their live and work environments as systems and generate solutions for effectively changing those environments.

TEP 5270. Dialogue Seminar. 0 Units.

TEP 5310B. Enhancing English Language Development with Literature. 2 Units.

TEP 5310C. Enhancing English Language Development With Literature. 3 Units.

This course is intended to explore the kinds of stories and perspectives that are introduced to children. What messages do they receive and as adults what can we do about that information? For the teachers in the course we will explore children's literature that can enhance all students' access to the core curriculum, particularly English Learners. Candidates will practice using children's literature to develop the thinking, reading, and speaking skills of English Language Development students. Part of this practice will include how to use literature to advance students' thinking about issues of prejudice, fairness, and equity. We will learn to evaluate a wide variety of children's literature in terms of its appropriateness and accessibility for all students. We will explore how to enhance the literature collection in our library as well as working together to support the Horace Mann Upstanders Award.

TEP 5310D. Enhancing Engilsh Language Wit. 1.33 Unit.

This course is intended to explore the kinds of stories and perspectives that are introduced to children. What messages do they receive and as adults what can we do about that information? For the teachers in the course we will explore children's literature that can enhance all students' access to the core curriculum, particularly English Learners. Candidates will practice using children's literature to develop the thinking, reading, and speaking skills of English Language Development students. Part of this practice will include how to use literature to advance students' thinking about issues of prejudice, fairness, and equity. We will learn to evaluate a wide variety of children's literature in terms of its appropriateness and accessibility for all students.

TEP 5330.LA. Field Practicum. 10 Units.

The field practicum is designed as a laboratory for concurrent methods courses. Candidates are placed in schools where they observe and participate using the theories and strategies taught in these courses. Candidates work with children from diverse cultural and language backgrounds. The praticum is designed to cover topics related to the development of reflective practice.

TEP 5330A. Field Practicum. 6 Units.

TEP 5360.LA. Foundations of Social Justice Education. 4 Units.

This course provides an orientation to the philosophies of teaching and learning that guide the MAE/TC degree. A primary objective is to facilitate candidates' beginning constructions of their professional identities as teachers in diverse classrooms. Candidates study multiple aspects of the history, philosophy, sociology, politics, pedagogy, and purposes in public education in the US. Candidates also review the demographics of student populations and how they are related to student outcomes, including careful examinations of racism, classism, and other forms of bias and their relationships to the distribution of educational opportunities including good teachers. The discipline Frameworks, Content Standards, and Standardized Testing are studied and critiqued from a variety of perspectives. While developing their own philosophy of education statement, candidates study how to establish a caring learning community based on the principle of mutual respect.

TEP 5370.LA. Mediation and Conflict Resolution in Schools. 3 Units.

In this highly experiential course, candidates learn and practice mediation and conflict resolution strategies for working with groups common to classrooms and schools, as well as individuals. Emphasis is placed on using these skills and strategies with children, peers, and colleagues who may differ from the self in terms of culture, age, ethnicity, language use, gender, sexual preference, social class, and professional position.

TEP 5380.LA. Classroom Organization Theory and Practice. 3 Units.

In this course, candidates study the social and developmental psychology and sociology of classrooms. They also examine the philosophy behind popular methods of behavior management. Classroom models from democratic to autocratic are studied while candidates observe and participate in assigned classrooms. Candidates reflectively construct an organization plan for their own practice.

TEP 5390.LA. Rethinking Secondary Education: Single Subject Methodology. 4 Units.

TEP 5440. Child Development & Learning. 3 Units.

The course explores current child development theories and their classroom applications for children in grades K through 8. By exercising analysis of the child's behavior and results of professional research, the course involves candidates into a systemic vision of learning as an intrinsic part of natural interplay and unity of biological, cognitive, social and psychological processes in child development. The major topics include physical, cognitive, social-emotional development and resilience in childhood. This course is built as a means of evoking and developing candidates' personal experiences with the process of their own and other people's growing up and learning. The course emphasizes developmentally appropriate teaching practices. Candidates will gain knowledge and skills essential to the guidance of children including creating and maintaining effective learning environments. The course utilizes an array of reading materials and multimedia.

TEP 5450. Language Development & Acquisition. 3 Units.

This course will examine theories of first- and second-language acquisition, language structure and its use, and the developmental and socio-cultural factors that affect language learning and use. We'll also consider how language policies and larger societal discourse shapes the work that we do in classrooms as well as the identities students take up and display in and through language. The course focuses on dialects and standard languages, the implications of the differential status of language and dialects, value systems, acculturation patterns, and language environments. Relevant federal and state laws, policies, and legal requirements governing the education of second-language learners are studied, along with a review of different school-based programs designed to support English language development. Throughout the course we invite you to examine your own beliefs about language, reflect on your experiences as both learners and teachers, and draw connections between theory and practice.

TEP 5650. Adaptation Pedagogy. 3 Units.

In light of recent education policy changes that focus on rigorous and structured instructional practices that may exclude the specific needs of individual students, particularly of ELL and special needs students, it is more vital than ever to design curricula that allow appropriate and supportive access to the content for all students. Creating a flexible yet robust curriculum requires a novel perspective on teaching and learning that is referred to as Adaptation Pedagogy.This course is designed to parallel the fieldwork course (TEP 533) and will allow candidates to explore with increasing depth diverse methods for learning about specific student needs, for looking at the students' longitudinal academic development, for designing and implementing appropriate intervention strategies for students of need, and for exploring the candidate's implied and stated beliefs, attitudes, and expectations related to teaching in diverse communities. Topics will include ethnicity, race, socio-economic, cultural, academic, and linguistic or family backgrounds; gender, gender identity, and sexual orientation; students with disabilities and advanced learners; and students with a combination of special instructional needs.

TEP 5960. Independent Learning. 1-5 Unit.

TEP 5990. TPA Workshop. 0 Units.

There are four workshops designed to provide credential candidates with the knowledge and skills necessary to complete California State's Teacher Performance Assessments (CalTPA). This course is designed to provide support for candidates to meet the California requirements for these assessments. The products of the workshops will be draft responses that candidates will submit individually to State calibrated assessors.

TEP 6010A. Social and Legal Dimensions of Special Education. 2 Units.

This course provides candidates with information required to meet the needs of exceptional students. Content areas include state and federal special education legislation, exceptional learner characteristics, referral practice, and mainstreaming principles. As a result of this course, teacher candidates will understand their legal obligations with respect to students with special needs and will be able to clearly identify students for appropriate referral. Candidates will be able to advocate for the needs of special students and be aware of family issues with respect to disability.

TEP 6010B. Teaching and Accommodating Students with Disabilities. 1 Unit.

This course builds upon the knowledge gained by candidates in TEP 601A. Candidates will learn skills necessary to accommodate the special education student within a mainstream environment. Candidates learn informal assessment, instructional planning and evaluation, behavior encouragement techniques, mainstreaming principles, and consultation skills. As a result of this course, teacher candidates will be able to interface with special education personnel, implement and evaluate special learner programs, and work effectively with exceptional learners in the regular classroom environment.

TEP 6020.LA. Advocating for Healthy Children. 2 Units.

This course covers knowledge about cultural and socioeconomic differences relative to nutrition, physical and mental health, and healthcare service issues. Candidates learn skills in working with students and families from diverse backgrounds for the purposes of providing effective interventions concerning health problems. Drug awareness and sexuality education programs are examined and candidates develop their positions on these issues. Candidates learn skills in identifying and reporting physical and psychological neglect and abuse, substance abuse, and information regarding various referral options.

TEP 6030B. Graduate Seminar. 1-6 Unit.

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to intensively study selected areas of contemporary education issues. The course will provide a knowledge base that is conceptual and empirical and will help students develop independent inquiry skills. Students will explore and pose problems and possible solutions related to the area to be explored.

TEP 6030H. Graduate Seminar: History of Ideas. 3 Units.

We shall survey social, economic, religious and other influences that have come to bear on the formation of our political perspectives. We shall also look at some views of what can best be called human nature from the perspectives of the drives and motivations that lead to undertaking a specific political perspective. From this foundation we will turn to pursuing and understanding the motivations and rationales that might lead an individual to champion either the Liberal or Conservative perspective. Toward the end of the course you will asked to argue for the political system you believe to be most appropriate, incorporating the issues raised in this course. You are asked to keep the following goals and dispositions in mind.

TEP 6060. Diversity in Schools. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help become more aware of the cultural and social scripts that they use to understand the world and that drive their practice. Candidates will be asked to examine and critique their own cultural biases and their taken-for-granted definitions of reality that shape their norms, values, and assumptions about our children, our schools, and the society in which we live. Candidates will look closely at the theoretical, cultural, social, political, economic, legal and historical context of education and the inequalities inherent in the educational system and process.

TEP 6170AA. Access and Equity for Special Populations. 1 Unit.

TEP 6170B. Advanced Use of Educational Technology. 1 Unit.

This course will enable credential candidates to build upon skills and knowledge gained during preliminary preparation by investigating best practices in using classroom technology, to prepare students to be life-long learners in an information-based, interactive society. Candidates will make appropriate and efficient use of software and related media to create and teach technology-integrated lessons within a constructivist pedagogy. They will revise and adapt lessons to reflect best practices learned in integrating technology into the curriculum.

TEP 6170C. Social Justice Health. 1 Unit.

Candidates will earn to deliver comprehensive support for student's physicals, cognitive, emotional and social well being based on an understanding of the relationship between student health, learning and discrimination. Each candidate will learn to promote personal, classroom and school safety through informal assessment, instructional planning and the implementation if appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. Each candidate will learn to access local and community resources to support student health, as well as major state and federal laws related to health and safety, including reporting requirements and parents' rights. Candidates will learn to implement appropriate elements of the adopted health curriculum with an emphasis on health related social justice issues.

TEP 6170D. Differentiated Instruction for Unversal Access. 2 Units.

TEP 617D is designed for professional educators who have earned a preliminary California State Teaching Credential and are seeking to clear the credential. The course explores and supports the development of pedagogical content knowledge in and across all areas of the curriculum, and makes visible ways for teachers to construct and maintain a caring learning environment intentionally designed to provide access for diverse learners to the curriculum as defined by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Professional educators explore and construct strategies to differentiate by learning modalities, applying universal design methods and research-based strategies that support English Language Development. The course foregrounds: Social Learning Theories and Practice, Specially Designed Academic Instruction in English (SDAIE), flexible grouping methods, and brain-based strategies that educators learned in their preliminary preparation year. Finally, educators will advance their technological knowledge base through application of on-line resources, apps, and platforms such as Facebook, Pintrest, Google Docs, Gmail, Google Hangout, Twitter, etc. Each candidate will integrate technological platforms into lessons/ activities in ways that foster universal access to learning.

TEP 6210. Thesis Completion and Publication. 6 Units.

TEP 6210A. Thesis Study. 3-6 Unit.

The course's central goal is to help students further examine their research question and determine any necessary next steps to complete their thesis. Students will study and practice professional data interpretation, writing, organization and presentation skills. Students will review other these and offer critique of each others work. In this course, students will prepare their poster session presentations and collaborate in the creation of the Capstone Event. The course will be conducted through interactive practices that are intended to enhance the skills of civic education for each student.

TEP 6220. Integrated Curriculum I. 2 Units.

This intensive workshop helps teachers in K-8 classrooms prepare for and improve their skills in a hands-on, interactive context. Topics include curriculum development, lesson planning, field trips, writer's workshop, classroom arrangement, parent meetings, and homework.

TEP 6220A. Professional Inquiry and Collegial Observation I. 1 Unit.

TEP 6220B. Professional Inquiry and Collegial Observation II. 1 Unit.

TEP 6220C. Professional Inquiry and Collegial Observation III. 1 Unit.

TEP 6230. Review of Educational Research. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce candidates to issues central to critical qualitative educational research, with emphasis on action research methods and becoming teacher-researchers. Candidates use critical reading, writing, inquiry, and discussion. Candidates reflect on, develop, and articulate their own perspectives relative to the course content. Candidates begin to design an action research project, which they will continue to build upon throughout the year.

TEP 6250. Financing School Change. 2 Units.

This course is designed to provide MAE candidates the technical and practical knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to successfully pursue grant funding from government agencies, public, private and corporate foundations for creating community programs, conducting academic and community based research projects. Candidates will learn how to develop compelling, well-written proposals, and the strategies used by successful grant writers to significantly increase their funding success. The course is intended to prepare candidates interested in pursuing careers in education, research, non-profit management, and public service. This course will compliment university courses in research methodology.

TEP 6290A. Educational Research: Inquiry II. 3 Units.

This course follows TEP 623 and provides support for MAE candidates to continue developing their action research projects. Designed with both seminar and individual candidate-faculty sessions, the course will provide skills and guidance for candidates to complete the literature review, clearly identify and study their project's methodological approach, and obtain all necessary permissions to conduct research beginning the following quarter, if not earlier.

TEP 6290B. Educational Research: Inquiry III. 3 Units.

This course follows TEP 629B and provides support for MAE candidates to continue developing their action research projects. Designed with both seminar and individual candidate-faculty sessions, the course will provide skills and guidance for candidates to complete the literature review, clearly identify and study their project's methodological approach, implement their action research projects, continue data collection and analysis, and begin interpretation of their data.

TEP 6290C. Collaborative Inquiry III. 2 Units.

TEP 6300.LA. Apprenticeship for Social Justice. 3 Units.

TEP 6310A. Resillience Education. 1 Unit.

Candidates will apply knowledge and skills acquired in their preliminary credential preparation to provide comprehensive support for student's physical, cognitive, emotional and social well-being based on an understanding of relationships between student health, a caring learning environment and discrimination. Topics for this course focus on community building in classrooms and schools as a mediating variable in developing positive behaviors and a positive disposition toward learning. Candidates use methods learned during their preliminary credential preparation year to promote respect, value differences, and mediate conflicts. Each candidate will learn to promote personal, classroom and school safety through informal assessment, instructional planning, and the implementation of appropriate prevention and intervention strategies. The PORT model of Resilience Education will be introduced and practiced. Each candidate will demonstrate how to access local and community resources to support all students. Participants in the course will use personal reflection and curriculum development for the purpose of strengthening their own and their students' resilience.

TEP 6340.LA. Critical Media Literacy. 3 Units.

The twentieth century brought about an explosion of different ideas about how children develop and learn and how they should be educated. Some radical, some conservative, these models continue to be presented as the best ways for children to learn. Is there one way? This course explores a number of alternative secular school approaches, both public and private, with the purpose of investigating core differences in conceptions of children, learning development, and the aims of education.

TEP 6350A. Review of Educational Research. 3 Units.

This course is designed to introduce candidates to issues central to critical qualitative educational research, with emphasis on action research methods and becoming teacher-researchers. Candidates use critical reading, writing, inquiry, and discussion. Candidates reflect on, develop, and articulate their own perspectives relative to the course content. Candidates begin to design an action research project, which they will continue to build upon throughout the year.

TEP 6350B. Constructing a Literature Review. 3 Units.

This course follows TEP 635A and provides support for MAE candidates to continue developing their action research projects. Designed with both seminar and individual student-faculty sessions, the course will provide skills and guidance for candidates to complete the literature review, clearly identify and study their project's methodological approach, and obtain all necessary permissions to conduct research beginning the following quarter, if not earlier.

TEP 6350D. Project Production and Dissemination. 3 Units.

This course follows TEP 635C and is designed to provide support for MAE candidates to complete their action research projects. Designed with both seminar and individual student-faculty sessions, the course will provide skills and guidance for candidates to develop the final sections of their project, including the findings, discussionn and conclusion. Candidates will also review and critique the projects of their fellow cohort.

TEP 6370.LA. Global Perspectives in an Era of Change. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help candidates develop the competence to function effectively and ethically in a complex, rapidly changing world that is increasingly interdependent yet fraught with conflicts and disparities. Learning to look at the world from a global perspective assures that graduates have had at least one significant academic exposure to the world beyond the US borders and the opportunity to consider their implications of this knowledge of the international community and their own lives. Topics addressed will include contemporary popular culture, nationalism, globalization, international education, human rights, economics, regional, ethnic or religious conflict and the role of government. Through concentrated study of a particular country, culture or region or through in-depth focus on a particular global issue with reference to two of more parts of the world, or through the study of global affairs by comparative method, candidates may cultivate a broader and more thoughtful perspective; increase their global awareness; and learn the importance of the particularities of place, time, and culture to understand our world in order to become a world citizen. Topics vary for each Global Perspectives class by quarter.

TEP 6380. Leadership & Change. 3-4 Unit.

This course will familiarize candidates with traditional and modern concepts of leadership and organizational change. Candidates will apply these concepts to hypothetical situations and those based on real world experiences within the students' organizations. Historical and contemporary leaders will be examined to trace common themes of leadership and to contrast differences. In addition, candidates will explore various leadership styles and traits to discover their own leadership styles and strengths. Lastly, candidates will research real world leaders to discover how they bring both stability and change to people and organizations.

TEP 6390. Global Perspectives in an Era of Change II. 3 Units.

This course is designed to help candidates develop the competence to function effectively and ethically in a complex, rapidly changing world that is increasingly interdependent yet fraught with conflicts and disparities. Learning to look at the world from a global perspective assures that graduates have had at least one significant academic exposure to the world beyond the US borders and the opportunity to consider their implications of this knowledge of the international community and their own lives. Topics addressed will include contemporary popular culture, nationalism, globalization, international education, human rights, economics, regional, ethnic or religious conflict and the role of government. Through concentrated study of a particular country, culture or region or through in-depth focus on a particular global issue with reference to two of more parts of the world, or through the study of global affairs by comparative method, candidates may cultivate a broader and more thoughtful perspective; increase their global awareness; and learn the importance of the particularities of place, time, and culture to understand our world in order to become a world citizen. Topics vary for each Global Perspectives class by quarter.

TEP 6420. Current Trends in Neuroscience. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to introduce candidates to the current research in neuro-cognitive understanding, focusing primarily on the executive functions of the pre-frontal cortex. Candidates will briefly review the physiology of the brain and a brief history of brain research. Implications of the research for successful communication, management and differentiation in real world environments will be studied. Understanding brain-compatible approaches will be emphasized.

TEP 6430. Advanced Leadership. 3 Units.

This course will build on the concepts visited in the Education 638 course. Students will examine organizational structures and processes to diagnose leadership needs. Students will also use scenario situations in a laboratory setting to gain insights into practical leadership applications and gain further insight into their own leadership strengths and preferences. Research will be done to gain an understanding of modern leadership philosophy. Lastly, students will study real world leaders to discover how they bring both stability and change to organization organizations.

TEP 6440. Education-Community Contexts & Interactions. 3 Units.

TEP 6450. An Intro to Ecoliteracy. 3 Units.

As we begin the 21st century on Earth, the living inhabitants of the planet stand positioned at the foot a great wave of social crisis and global ecological catastrophe. They are already nearly drowned in an ocean of post-WWII social transformations, in economies of capital, and in the cultural revolution that has resulted from rapid advances in military science and technology - that which is frequently referred to under the moniker of globalization. Thus, our moment is new - never before have the collected mass beings of the planet Earth been so thoroughly threatened with extinction as they are now and never before have so many of us raised this problem consciously and desperately together in the hopes of transforming society towards a better, more peaceable kingdom as a result. And yet, the present does not arise in a vacuum, but rather out of the concreteness of history itself. We move, then, in a sea of possibilities and swirling energies. Amidst these energies arises the great wave; and it is crashing and we who are threatened with annihilation and asked to threaten others with the same are its driftwood. Will we then be smashed to splinters upon the polluted beach of no tomorrow? Will we surf the awesome tube of this grave peril and move laterally across it into newly imagined freedoms? Or will we head outward into deeper waters still, floating upon unfathomable depths, along with dangers and possibilities even as of yet unforeseen?.

TEP 6470. Grant Proposal Development. 3 Units.

This course will introduce and familiarize students with the technical and practical knowledge, understanding, and skills necessary to successfully pursue grant funding. Students will be able to apply these skills to secure funding from government agencies, public, private and corporate foundations to create educational-related projects/programs, as well as for conducting academic and community-based research. This course will be a learning lab where students will walk through the steps to develop an actual funding proposal that can be used as a base for funding opportunities in the future.

TEP X2000. Teacher Educ Prep / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

TEP X2003. Tchr Ed Prep & Child Stu / Soc Sci Dom. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

TEP X4000. Teacher Educ Prep / Soc Sci Domain. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

TEP X4003. Tchr Ed Prep & Child Stu / Soc Sci Dom. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

TEP X5000. MA Education Elective. 1-9 Unit.

General Education Transfer Credit Equivalency: Do not make any sections from this course.

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